Current News

NEWS January/Feb 2014

HindlePower Webinars

HindlePower has scheduled a number of informative webinars covering a variety of topics. Each webinar will be presented in two sessions, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. The following webinars will be hosted by our Art Salander, Business Development Manager and Applications Engineering. Additional topics may be added due to market feedback and demand. Here’s the line-up of what we have for you thus far:
 
Overview of AT 10 / 30 Series Battery Charger Technology and Specifying Details. (1 hour)
Includes –

  • Breadth of product line
  • Technology and explanation of how it works
  • Filtering
  • Design standards
  • Understanding basic features and functions
  • Communications systems
  • Live Demo of the web site www.HindlePowerinc.com and its resources.
 
Friday April 11th
Session 1 – 10:00AM EST
Session 2 – 02:00PM EST
 
Monday Sep 15th 
Session 1 – 10:00AM EST
Session 2 – 02:00PM EST
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Battery Charger Sizing Techniques (30 minutes)
Includes –
  • Information required to properly size a stationary battery charger
  • Definition of loads – transient vs constant
  • Overview of recharge factors
  • Compensating for Temperature and Altitude
  • Sizing considerations for different Battery Types
 
Monday March 10th 
Session 1 – 10:00AM EST
Session 2 – 02:00PM EST
 
Monday October 6th 
Session 1 – 10:00AM EST
Session 2 – 02:00PM EST
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Stationary Battery Sizing using IEEE 485 (1 hour)
Rt method only.
(Bring your calculator - no computer programs for this one!)
Includes –
  • How to construct a load profile
  • How to apply the standard
  • Proving your results
 
Monday June 2nd  
Session 1 – 10:00AM EST
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Battery History (30 minutes)
19th Century Battery History
Includes –
An entertaining look as to how the stationary battery developed from the earliest 18th Century developments through to some 20th century work too.
 
Monday November 17th  
Session 1 – 10:00AM EST
Session 2 – 02:00PM EST

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Upcoming Trade Show Participation

2014 IEEE-PES Transmission and Distribution Conference and Exhibition - Chicago, IL
This year's IEEE-PES T&D Conference and Exhibition, arguably the most prominent and important event in the Utility Industry, will be held at the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago, IL on April 14 through 17, 2014. This 4-day venue brings together several hundred industry professionals for conference topics and exhibits focused on power transmission and distribution. HindlePower will, once again, be exhibiting at this event (Booth # 5759). Exhibits run April 15 through 17, 2014. We look forward to seeing you there!
 
2014 Battcon – Boca Raton, FL
We are pleased to announce that HindlePower, Inc. will be exhibiting at the upcoming 18th annual Battcon®  International Stationary Battery Conference and Trade Show. The conference will be held May 5 through May 7, 2014, at the Boca Raton Resort and Club, a Waldorf Astoria Resort, Boca Raton, Florida.

Battcon® is a three day, non-commercial, technical event for storage battery users from a broad range of industries. It is the premier conference for end-users, technologists, and manufacturers. The event features a two day trade show packed with storage power related vendors, plus optional seminars with CEU's awarded. Users, manufacturers of batteries and battery test equipment, installers, researchers, and standards and safety experts attend the conference to learn about and discuss the latest industry developments.

For more information, visit the Battcon web-site at: http://www.battcon.com/
 
 
 
2014 IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition – Long Island, NY
 
HindlePower will be participating in the IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition on October 27 through 28, 2014 at the Clarion Hotel & Conference Center, Long Island - Islip Airport, Long Island, NY.


The IEEE NewNEB Conference is a DC utility users conference dedicated to the electric utility field and boasts a User's Forum which will be led by electric utility pros for the purpose of sharing ideas and developing industry goals.
 
For more information visit the NewNEB web-site at: http://www.newneb.org

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IEEE -NEMA PE5 Working Group (as part of the IEEE SBC)
Jan. 6, 2014 Meeting Report

P2405 - has been approved as of January 17th, 2014! An agreement has been reached between NEMA and the IEEE to work together on a new and updated version of this standard that will be co-authored under an IEEE PAR. Click here for more details....
   
A special page detailing the IEEE Battery Charger Standard Working Group, including meeting notes and contacts, has been developed to keep you better informed. Note that this page is not locked but just does not appear on the www.NewNEB.org website directory. 

Please be sure to book mark this page after you have visited it so you may return easily.  This page will post any relevant items about the Conference Committee:
IEEE Battery Charger Standard Working Group

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NEWS December 2013

Farewell to the ANSI 61 Gray Lady: SCR/F Charger Production to Cease

After more than 40 years of production, HindlePower will discontinue production of our analog SCR/F Chargers, effective May 1, 2014. This announcement applies to the single and 3-phase 12, 24, 48 and 130VDC models.
We will however, continue to manufacture the 260VDC SCR/F chargers as we do not offer an equivalent product in our microprocessor controlled AT10/AT30 Charger Line. In addition, custom chargers requiring options not available or compatible with the AT Series Chargers will continue to be offered as an analog SCR charger. We will continue to support our installed base of SCR/F products with replacement parts indefinitely.

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Instructional Video Series: Installing the Auxiliary Alarm Relay Board AT10.1 Group 1 Battery Chargers

HindlePower recently completed yet another instructional video entitled: “Installing the Auxiliary Alarm Relay Board on AT10.1 Group 1 Battery Chargers.” This  presentation offers detailed, step by step instructions for field installing the alarm board. Check it out!
 
Here’s the link
 
See this and other informational videos on our YouTube channel.

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Cutting Edge #4



At HindlePower we strive to keep up with the latest technologies, not just in our products, but also in our personal lives.

Recently one of our employees purchased an American-manufactured battery-electric vehicle (BEV).  In cooperation with the employee, HindlePower installed an Electric Vehicle Charging Station in our parking lot.   This allows the car’s Lithium-Ion battery pack to be recharged while employees are working.  Instead of gasoline, commutes home from our facility in this vehicle are now powered by clean electricity...the same electricity that HindlePower battery chargers support throughout our nation's grid.  The charging station features two 240Vac J1772 connectors.  When a second employee purchases an electric car, or if one of our guests arrives in an EV, they can rest assured that the vehicle will be charged up and ready to go when they leave.

HindlePower is committed to embracing new technologies, American manufacturing, and domestically-produced clean electricity.  To learn more about our latest advancements, please visit our website.

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NEWS November 2013

Instructional Video Series: AC Input Voltage Change


HindlePower recently completed another instructional video entitled: “AT10.1 Group 1 (6-25Adc) AC Input Voltage Change.” This relatively short (about 5 minutes) presentation offers detailed instructions for changing the taps on the ac input transformer. Check it out!
 
Here’s the link
 
See this and other informational videos on our YouTube channel.

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Console Drawings


Due to the degree of customization and complexity associated with our console/cabinet systems, we generate mandatory approval drawings with all console orders. These drawings are released for your approval, prior to any production of your order. The idea here is to confirm we build the system as you intended, in an effort to avoid any misinterpretations. The production phase of your order begins upon receipt of your approval. The lead time "clock" starts upon the receipt of your approved drawings.

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HindlePower Employee appointed to IEEE Chairman Position


Our Art Salander was recently appointed chairman of the IEEE Stationary Battery Committee Working Group responsible for writing the standard on Utility Battery Chargers. This committee will be collaborating with NEMA to create a new and unique charger standard for the utility industry. Congratulations Art! For more information click here

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What does it mean to be a battery eliminator?

In response to many questions on this topic, most folks are asking about how a battery charger can call itself a battery eliminator and yet not perform like a battery? This is a great question. Unfortunately the terminology “battery eliminator” is not as precise as it could be. Much like “duck sauce” is not made from ducks, “lobster sauce" has no lobster in it or as the late George Carlin would say, “Why do we park on a drive way and drive on a parkway?” certain phrases are not always completely precise but their meaning needs to be understood just the same.

For battery chargers we have a few assumptions. First, the battery charger is there to charge the battery and operate the steady loads when the AC is on. If the charger were to operate the switchgear during an electrical outage it then becomes the same as a battery. Therefore, if it were a battery why call it a battery eliminator? We could just call the charger the battery too. Confusing? Not really! We must all agree that a battery charger is a battery charger and a battery is a battery! (Sigmund Freud would like that.)

Although certain applications may find it practical to use the charger to operate switchgear this would not cause us to consider offering “switchgear operating curves” for our chargers. This effort would involve an added feature that we would neither be able to control nor predict performance. While it is true that in certain cases these unusual performances may occur, we would not provide that as part of our operating capability because there is no specific standard that determines how this works with consistency or repeatability.

The battery charger will operate as a power supply up to its current limit rating within the confines of both the slow start circuit used to protect the load and battery while operating within a step change rate that occurs within 200ms and 500ms. (See NEMA PE5, Section 5.10) We do not offer “switchgear use” curves to predict this because the battery capacitive reactance, resistances, load characteristics, and a host of other issues affect this performance.

Remember, in any battery/charger scenario the battery controls the bus voltage and the charger provides the current to maintain that voltage. What is sometimes requested of us is for the charger alone to operate switchgear, based on calculating a defined current performance with an unpredictable bus voltage in order to determine how much current I can get for how long. There is no equation to solve for this repeatedly or consistently because of the many variables involved.

Further issues exist when trying to operate an inductive device whose true current demands are not always readily available. Those solenoid devices used to operate switchgear can demand very large up front currents that the batteries will deliver but the charger cannot. These currents are not always clearly stated in the switchgear specifications and have been recorded to be as much as 10 times or more of the device’s plate rating. The charger is limited to its current limit as the maximum output current available and initially when current limit is achieved the full voltage may not be available, further detracting from this as a viable and saleable possibility. When exploring the issues of Constant Loads vs. Transient Loads the controls put onto a battery charger are very important features. If a utility type battery charger is not properly regulated it would go into overvoltage and/or overcurrent, either of which could harm a battery or load. Therefore, if the charger could accommodate the potential wild swings that a battery can perform, then the charger could damage the battery because you need to include the fact that an increasing voltage is also possible from the charger.

The battery starts discharging at OCV (open circuit voltage) without any external energy source while the charger has the AC input to draw from. When a battery outputs, it outputs current, while the voltage trails off but a charger and or power supply that is not regulated would then output currents such that the voltage could exceed normal. The utility battery charger has what is known as a rectangular output making it uniquely qualified to use current to control voltage by means of regulation. The battery just outputs current while the voltage decays. These are two very different ways of operating.

Considering all the possible variables, we cannot provide a table to determine switchgear operation using only a battery charger. Said ability is fraught with downsides and will only cause problems in the long run. If a specifier believes that a certain charger will operate their switchgear then it must remain with the specifier to determine.

We have no way of testing, calculating, or determining all the possible variables that may or may not allow switchgear to operate off a battery charger without a battery connected. Unless the AC is on and the operating load falls within the confines of our advertised ability, where the desired current demand coupled with a slow start capability that includes step changes to occur within 200ms to 500ms up to but not exceeding our current limit level of 110% of rating, we cannot assure you that for this scenario switchgear will operate without a battery connected.

In the final analysis, the term battery eliminator just means that the charger may operate as a regulated power supply without the battery connected with the output ripple not exceeding the NEMA PE5 standards for amplitude. I hope this helps clear up some of these questions. However, if you still have more questions, please let us know..  

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NEWS October 2013

INTRODUCING... The AT10.1 (6-25amp) Critical Component Kit


HindlePower is proud to announce the release of it's new AT10.1 (6-25amp) Critical Component Kit. The Critical Component Kit is a robust field repair kit that is equipped with major charger components, specialized tools and installation instructions. The kit minimizes potential costly down time, while delivering confidence and peace of mind. Follow this link to download the Critical component Kit flyer and part number to place your order.

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HindlePower Mobile DC Power System Receives Design Patent


HindlePower is excited to announce that it has received the first of its patents for the Mobile DC Power System. Patent US DC691,925 S, is a design patent that covers the shape and physical design of the trailer. HindlePower is also awaiting the finalization of the Mobile DC Power System's  utility patent which will cover the function of the trailer systems. 

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HindePower "How Tos" New Instructional training videos!


Do you know about HindlePower's YouTube channel? Here you can find videos about our company, videos about our products and videos about how to use our products. As part of our training and education program (HindlePower University) we have begun creating a library of technical "How To" videos that will be accessible from anywhere with an internet connection. Imagine being on site and needing to change the AC Input Voltage on an AT10.1 Group 1 charger. Now you can head to YouTube on your mobile device and watch a quick video on the exact step by step process. The newest addition to the YouTube channel is "HindlePower How To: Changing the AT10.1 (6-25 AMP) AC Input Voltage". It is our hope to bring you new videos each month, so check back each month to find out what our newest addition will be.  

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NEWS September 2013

The Cutting Edge #4


As sometimes occurs, user specifications requiring some unique or not-previously-offered option evolve into a new product enhancement. Here is a perfect example.

Recently, a customer approached us requesting that our AT10 Charger provide a remote high temperature alarm based on battery temperature. In order to provide this capability, we combined elements of our Over Temperature Alarm Relay Contact with our Temperature Compensation Option with remote probe to create this new feature.

When attached to the battery terminal, the probe measures and compares the battery temperature with that of the alarm set point. If the battery temperature exceeds the alarm set-point, the alarm relay is energized and sends a signal to the customer’s alarm panel alerting the operator of an over-temp condition.

To get a better understanding of what we are describing click here. We will be offering pricing for this new option to all our channel partners. The part number is EJ5208-XX.

We love when customers have suggestions. Please contact us if you have a special request or require a charger function that is not currently offered. There’s always a possibility that we will be able to incorporate your idea as a new charger option!

Thanks.
Gary G.

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Renewables Top 14 Percent of U.S. Electrical Generation


According to the September 23, 2013 article (below) appearing in the Green Lodging News, renewable energy sources surpassed 14% of U.S. electrical power generation, based on data in a report through June 30, 2013:
 
WASHINGTON, D.C.—According to the latest issue of the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Electric Power Monthly, with preliminary data through to June 30, 2013, renewable energy sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, wind) provided 14.20 percent of the United States’ net electric power generation during the first half of the year. For the same period in 2012, renewables accounted for 13.57 percent of net electrical generation. 

Moreover, non-hydro renewables have more than tripled their output during the past decade. They now account for almost the same share of electrical generation (6.71 percent) as does conventional hydropower (7.49 percent). Ten years ago (i.e., calendar year 2003), non-hydro renewables provided only 2.05 percent of net U.S. electrical generation. 

Comparing the first six months of 2013 to the same period in 2012, solar thermal and photovoltaics combined have grown 94.4 percent while wind increased 20.1 percent and geothermal grew by 1.0 percent. Biomass declined by 0.5 percent while hydropower dropped by 2.6 percent. Among the non-hydro renewables, wind is in the lead, accounting for 4.67 percent of net electrical generation, followed by biomass (1.42 percent), geothermal (0.43 percent), and solar (0.19 percent). 

The balance of the nation’s electrical generation mix for the first half of 2013 consisted of coal (39.00 percent—up by 10.3 percent), natural gas and other gas (26.46 percent—down by 13.6 percent), nuclear power (19.48 percent—up by 0.2 percent), and petroleum liquids + coke (0.66 percent—up by 15.6 percent). The balance (0.21 percent) was from other sources and pumped hydro storage.

“Every year for the past decade, non-hydro renewables have increased both their net electrical output as well as their percentage share of the nation’s electricity mix,” said Ken Bossong, Executive Director of the SUN DAY Campaign. “Moreover, the annual rate of growth for solar and wind continues in the double digits, setting new records each year.”

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NYCTA 7 Line Extension Relies on the AT Charger

HindlePower’s AT series chargers are the standard for the new 7 Line Extension in New York City!  Working in conjunction with NYCTA, MTA, Con Edison, and Powell Electric-Ohio Division, our sales channel Alpine Power’s Jude Cuddy together  with this writer had an opportunity to see our products in application. 
 
The 7th Avenue Line Extension has been the dream of New Yorkers for several years.  Finally in 2007 the contract was awarded to add 7000 feet to the NYCTA system on the west side of Manhattan.  This addition consisted of 2 tubes with tracks and stations to accommodate an area formally not served by any subway system.  This meant that such important NYC locations as the Jacob Javitts Center and the NY Port Authority did not have access to subway service.  When this system opens next year, subway service will be available all the way from the west side of Manhattan through Penn station and on to Citi Field in Queens including Flushing Meadow Corona Park.  The new system, which encompasses two large tunnels to be drilled under NYC streets, is an amazing feat and will be completed in record time! 
 
The AT series chargers used were built to meet the current NYCTA standards.  The NYCTA standards were recently modified with HindlePower’s assistance to provide all the required features that both NYCTA and Con Edison require.  

These chargers form the support system that keeps the utility power switch gear running smoothly.  The AT chargers with their associated battery systems provide 130VDC to this system for control and monitoring.  In the event of a power failure the batteries allow the switchgear to react to bring power to where it is needed after the emergency generators come on line.  When the commercial AC is restored the switchgear then returns the service to the utility source and the chargers will recharge the batteries.

 
 

This is critical service for this application as the system is over 10 stories below ground and that is no place to be without electricity!


 
HindlePower is proud to be a part of this effort and we are especially proud to have worked with Alpine Power and especially Jude Cuddy, who provided a substantial service to the folks at Powell in Ohio who built the switchgear and controls.
 
For more information about the 7 Line Extension please visit 

http://www.mta.info/capconstr/7ext/.  For more information about the HindlePower AT series charger systems, please contact us directly.



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Events Update

Monday October 7, 2013
IEEE Battery Charger Standard WG Meeting
Philadelphia, PA
Sponsored by HindlePower - no cost to attend includes luncheon & breaks.
Purpose:
PAR - IEEE/NEMA PE5 Utility Battery Charger Standard
Date: Monday, October 7th at noon & ending at 5PM EST
Working Group Site Details
Special Rates for Lodging
We have about 15+ people from our industry attending including representatives from DOE, NEMA, and most major charger manufacturers.
This is an important event that is a meeting of the IEEE SBC working group to write a PAR  to develop a new IEEE/NEMA Utility Type Battery charger Standard.
General Manager/Secretariat
Art.salander@ieee.org

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Friday October 25, 2013
Utility Battery Systems Seminar – An IEEE Event
Tampa, FL
Friday, October 25th, 2013
8:30am-9am Registration, 9am-3pm Seminar
$100 members, $200 Non-Members, $20 Students
Make checks payable to:
IEEE FWCS and mail a check in advance to IEEE FWCS
Treasurer: PES/IAS Chapter
2593 Forest Run Court
Clearwater, FL 33761-3716
For Registration & Details

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Monday through Wednesday, October 27-29, 2014
IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition

Long Island, NY
The IEEE NewNEB Conference is a DC utility users conference dedicated to the electric utility field and boasts a User's Forum which will be led by electric utility pros for the purpose of sharing ideas and developing industry goals.
NewNEB Site

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NEWS August 2013

Revised Operating Temperature Range for AT10 and AT30 Series Chargers


Due to continuous improvements made to our charger components and manufacturing processes, we are pleased to announce an expanded temperature operating range for our AT10 and AT30 Series Chargers. Effective immediately, the new and improved range is "-18°C- 50°C," from the previous "0°C - 50°C." This data is included in our recently revised electronic and hard-copy AT10.1 and AT30  product brochures found on our website at hindlepowerinc.com. We are in the process of updating our operating and service manuals to reflect these changes. We will inform you again once we complete the manual updates. Thanks.

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Utility Battery Systems Seminar

Date:  Friday, October 25th, 2013
Time:  8:30am-9am Registration, 9am-3pm Seminar
Cost:  $100 members, $200 Non-Members, $20 Students
Make checks payable to IEEE FWCS and mail a check in advance to IEEE FWCS
Treasurer:  PES/IAS Chapter
2593 Forest Run Court
Clearwater, FL 33761-3716

Speakers:   Art Salander, Roy Gates

Pdh’s:  4 Pdh’s (Professional Development Hours) will be awarded for this seminar.

Location: Seminole Electric Cooperative, 16313 North Dale Mabry,
Tampa, Florida 33618
Parking: Use parking lot in front of building.

RSVP:  Online at:  http://time2meet.com/fwcs-pes1/index.html 
Space limited to the first 45 registrants!!! 
Questions: Jim Howard at 863-834-6585 or Jim.Howard@Lakelandelectric.com

Topics
I. 19th Century Battery History
II. A study of Phased Controlled SCR charging
III. Determine Recharge Voltages
IV. Alarm settings
V. Enclosure types defined and considerations provided
VI. Ripple Content on the bus and what the allowable numbers really are
VII. Battery Charger Sizing Calculations
VIII. Practical Application of Modular Battery/charger Enclosures
IX. Mobile Power Systems
X. Using Diode Isolation Systems
XI. Stationary Batteries Defined: Flooded Lead Acid Batteries, Valve Regulated Lead Acid (VRLA) Batteries, Nickel Cadmium Batteries
XII. Battery Sizing
XIII. Installation / Maintenance / Testing / Maximizing your Investment
XIV. NERC PRC-005, DC System considerations with a review of the pertinent sections in the Supplemental Reference and how they may be implemented.

Speakers:

Art Salander – Graduate Adelphi University/Physics & Engineering, IEEE Senior Member, Art has lectured on many aspects of battery and charger applications and has worked on developing battery load profile and sizing techniques and standards in use today. He is also the current Conference Manager for the IEEE NewNEB Conference and is currently providing application engineering and business development for HindlePower, Inc.

Roy Gates - 25-years’ experience with stationary batteries, currently with HindlePower, Inc.  Experienced in a variety of electro-chemistries, including alkaline, lithium and traditional lead acid designs. His responsibilities ranged from systems design engineering to installation, testing and long-term maintenance, as well as training and education.  A sought after speaker within the IEEE Continuing Education on Demand community, Roy has given numerous papers and presentations on selection, sizing, configuring, and operating all types of energy storage devices.

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IEEE NewNEB DC Utility Power
Conference & Exhibition
Rescheduled to
October 27th - 29th 2014


After careful consideration we have determined that it is in the best interest of this conference to postpone it, in its entirety, for one year to October 27-29, 2014.

This was not an easy decision but an important one for all of us. It is our intention that the IEEE NewNEB DC Utility Power Conference & Exhibition be both a resounding success and that it garner the appropriate support from the electric utility industry. The current registration and program would not ensure that this goal would be met.

Having consulted with some of our prominent supporters, conference committee members, and the conference management, it is in the best interest of the event and the IEEE that we work a bit longer to make this program everything that it could be. We probably do not need an entire year, but in looking at schedules and other events on the calendar, waiting until October of 2014 just seemed to make the most sense and provide the least amount of conflicts with holidays, other industry events and activities.

The NewNEB conference, while it is gaining momentum, needs more time to create an even more dynamic program and to engage more direct electrical utility personnel. While we did implement some very exciting programs such as the lower rates for utility personnel and the Kindle fire HD™ giveaway, time was not on our side in promoting these. We want to give the industry a real chance at having a conference and exhibition that serves our industry; something our industry really needs, wants, and deserves!

In the coming weeks, we will be adding some very important features to the program in order to help it become more successful. This includes such items as CEUs (Continuing Education Units) and PDHs (Professional Development Hours) for our program, more utility industry speakers, a unique utility-only forum that addresses the needs of utility DC professionals and much more. We will also have the time to more actively promote all these features to the industry.

We will not change any of the current fees, rates, etc., and the venue has agreed to extend us to next year without any change or adjustments. We sincerely appreciate the cooperation and consideration provided to us by Clarion Hotel personnel. Further, several of our supporters have completely endorsed this revised plan and they also believe that waiting another year for something great is much better than settling for something good. We are hopeful that you will see the wisdom of our difficult decision and continue to support our efforts for an outstanding IEEE NewNEB DC Utility Power Conference & Exhibition in 2014!

On behalf of the IEEE, the conference committee, our volunteers and management, while we are disappointed at having to postpone this event we are confident about its ultimate success. We extend our apologies and regrets for any inconvenience this may cause. Anyone who is currently registered will retain their full registration rights for the coming conference in 2014. We will issue re-confirmations over the coming weeks.

With our extreme gratitude for your continued support,

Very truly yours,

Prof. Charles Rubenstein, PhD, CEng
General Conference Chair and Steering Committee Chair
c.rubenstein@ieee.org

Art Salander
General Manager/Secretariat
Art.salander@ieee.org.

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10th Anniversary of the Great Northeast Blackout


This month brought us the 10th anniversary of the Great Northeast Blackout (14 Aug, 2003) which highlighted just some of the vulnerability buried within our aging electric utility infrastructure.   Do keep in mind still, the electric distribution system servicing the USA is among the best in the world, if not THE BEST when considering the geography and varied population centers.
 
For many of us, the most notable outcome of that event was the granting of sharp teeth, in the form of financial penalties, to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (http://www.nerc.com), for failing to adhere to council approved guidelines.
 
This isn’t to say increased oversight and standardizing of maintenance practices is the sole response to a power outage that affected more than 50 million people in southeastern Canada and northeastern USA – so with this event as a backdrop, and the punishment the east coast has taken from Mother Nature the past few years, the White House (or the Obama Administration, your call, either work) reveals an investment program to upgrade and strengthen the grid – this is outlined in the accompanying article below.
 
The costs of power outages are astounding, especially when system analysts can present a return on investment (ROI) of nearly $21 billion dollars in four to six years.  
 
All of this ultimately results in opportunities to those of us serving the North American electric utility system – Good Luck and Thank You for your professional services to electricity users around America.

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White House calls for increased grid spending

NEW YORK (The Associated Press) - Aug 12 - JONATHAN FAHEY

The cost of weather-related power outages is high and rising as storms grow more severe and the U.S. electric grid gets older, according to an Obama Administration report that calls for increased spending on the nation's electric power system.
 
Power outages cost the economy $18 billion to $33 billion per year, according to the report, a figure that has been rising steadily over the past 20 years. That can rise to $40 billion to $75 billion in years with severe storms such as 2008's Hurricane Ike and last year's Superstorm Sandy.
 
The White House report, released Monday, said spending to make the grid stronger and more flexible will save the economy "billions of dollars and reduce the hardship experienced by millions of Americans when extreme weather strikes."
 
The administration proposes spending on training and preparation, stronger equipment such as concrete poles, and more advanced sensing and diagnostic equipment that can predict failures, prevent them from getting worse, and restore power faster after it has gone out.
 
Seven of the ten costliest storms in U.S. history occurred between 2004 and 2012. Eleven times last year weather-related outages led to losses of $1 billion or more, the second most on record, behind 2011, according to the report. Climate scientists expect ever more intense and destructive weather as climate change increases global temperatures, adding more energy to storms and shifting patterns of drought and precipitation.
 
 
Storms cause most of the nation's power outages. Thunderstorms, hurricanes, blizzards and other extreme weather caused 58 percent of all outages studied since 2002 and 87 percent of outages affecting 50,000 or more customers.
 
At the same time, the U.S. electric grid is getting old. The average U.S. power plant is 30 years old and 70 percent of the grid's transmission lines and transformers are at least 25 years old, making them weaker and more susceptible to failure in storms.
 
The U.S. electric power system is a web of generating stations, high-voltage wires that transmit power over long distances, substations, and local wires and equipment that deliver electricity to homes and businesses.
 
U.S. customers lose power on average 1.2 times per year, for a total of 112 minutes, according to PA Consulting Group. Nine out of ten of those outages are the result of problems with local distribution systems, according to the Edison Electric Institute, an electric industry lobbying group.
 
In the years after the Northeast Blackout of 2003, the most widespread outage ever in North America, investment in major transmission lines and equipment increased. According to an analysis of spending on major transmission equipment by more than 200 utilities nationwide conducted for the AP by Ventyx, a software and data services firm that works with electric utilities, utilities spent an average of $21,514 per year on devices and station equipment per mile of transmission line from 2003 to 2012. From 1994 to 2003, spending averaged $7,185 per year.
 
The White House report says increased spending in recent years has still not matched the level of investment between 1960 and 1990. It suggests new spending should be focused on a few main areas, including, "hardening" the system by installing stronger equipment, building more transmission wires and energy storage systems to make the grid better able to absorb shocks, and installing more sophisticated technology.
 
The report does not suggest how much new spending was needed, where that spending would come from,or how much money would be saved by preventing some outages and making others less severe.

Major upgrades to the grid can be difficult to initiate. Utilities do not build or install new  equipment without first  getting approval from state or federal regulators to charge customers. Regulators can be reluctant  to increase  customer rates, especially if it means spending on relatively novel high-tech equipment, or to  guard against  weather that may or may not arrive.

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NEWS July 2013

IEEE-USA Interviews Art Salander

Chris McManes, IEEE-USA Public Relations Manager, recently interviewed our Art Salander regarding the upcoming NewNEB Conference and Exhibition on October 7 and 8. This article will appear in the August 2013 issue of IEEE-USA Today's Engineer:

Ever since the Northeast Electric Utility Battery Conference (NEB) dissolved in the mid-1990s, Art Salander dreamed of a new, similar event. With IEEE-USA’s help, the reincarnated conference will return in October as the IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition.

NewNEB will feature topics of increasing importance to the electric utility industry – large-scale batteries, battery chargers, control systems, diagnostics and testing, and Smart Grid communications – with a special emphasis on backup power and DC power applications.

Industries serving this sector of the power grid have embraced the 7-8 October event at the Clarion Conference Center-Long Island in Ronkonkoma, N.Y. All available exhibitor booth space has sold out but there are a few exhibitor tables that are not taken and many other sponsorship opportunities, too.

“The reception has been phenomenal,” said Salander, an IEEE senior member electrical engineer who is managing NewNEB. “We have 18 corporate sponsors and many people have already registered. This particular facet of the DC power industry doesn’t have one single event to call its own, so it’s garnered a lot of interest.”

In addition to the two-day conference of technical papers, panel sessions and keynotes, a battery charger standard meeting will be held on 9 October. The current standard (NEMA PE5), hasn’t been updated since the early 1990s. This effort is directed at creating a new harmonized set of guidelines between IEEE and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association. Salander chairs the working group.

“That’s another big part of the event,” he said. “That standard hasn’t been touched in over 20 years, and when you read through it you can see the antiquity of it. It needs to be fixed, and it needs to be an IEEE standard, which it isn’t right now.

“We are encouraging NEMA to join us in this effort.”

Role of DC Power in Electric Reliability

While most people probably associate alternating current (AC) with electricity, direct current (DC) also plays a key role in the safety and reliability of the electric grid. Major circuit breakers, for one, depend upon battery systems, and DC power is particularly critical when complete power failure occurs.

“The only thing that’s going to get you going in a blackout is battery power,” Salander said. “All switchgear used for transmission and distribution is operated by DC because you need a high slug of energy for a short period of time. So batteries are used for that purpose – for flipping the switchgear – and in generation, they’re used for all kinds of things. Typically in gas turbine applications, it’s the battery system that keeps the turbines hydraulically balanced so you don’t have a mechanical issue.

“Also, all of your control circuits, valve closings and openings and other switching, is all accomplished by battery power. And you want to run it off of direct DC rather than convert it from AC because you lose a percentage of power in the conversion.

DC has a number of advantages over AC for these applications.

“DC power is easy to store, you can have a lot of available capacity in a fairly compact area if you have to, and it’s available to get your [electricity back],” Salander added. “So during a storm, for example, when all the lights go out and the grid shuts down, it’s the batteries that finally get you going again. That’s why they’re so critically important.

“If the batteries don’t work, you don’t get back on so easily.”

The value of DC power was readily apparent during Superstorm Sandy, which struck the northeastern United States last October and left about 8.5 million people without power. “Batteries played a very important role in getting people back on board,” Salander said. Having adopted the theme, “Ensuring Ultimate Reliability in a Changing Utility Environment,” NewNEB will also look at a proposed standard from the North American Electric Reliability Corporation – PRC-OO5 – which includes requirements for battery systems.

“Utilities need to deal with this because it all ties to system reliability,” Salander said. “The goal is to find the best way to monitor and ensure reliability of your battery system so that you ultimately ensure reliability of the transmission and distribution system.”

IEEE-USA’s Role

Salander’s vision of a battery-focused conference began to take shape after he was introduced to IEEE-USA Conferences Chair Charles Rubenstein in October 2011. IEEE-USA, following a few discussions, agreed to become NewNEB’s major sponsor. IEEE Region 1, the Long Island Section and its Power & Energy Society and Industry

Applications Society chapters are cosponsors.

Rubenstein is serving as general conference chair, and 2012 IEEE-USA President Jim Howard is treasurer. Plans are underway to stage the event around the country for at least 10 years.

“IEEE-USA is delighted to pair with a well-known force in the battery standards world, Art Salander, as our conference manager to bring back to life the old Northeast Electric Utility Battery Conference,” Rubenstein said. “It will bring utility users and suppliers together for forums, exhibits, paper and panel sessions and keynotes, and also provides a venue for NEMA and other standard reviews.”

Salander, who performs engineering and business development work for Easton, Pa.-based HindlePower, can’t wait for NewNEB. He thinks all those working in generation, transmission, distribution, renewable energy and Smart Grid, as well as utility testing, installation and maintenance, will benefit by attending the inaugural gathering.

“This is going to be an active, dynamic conference with a real roadmap to help people solve problems related to our part of the industry,” he said. “With strong support from utility folks – which we’ve already seen – the conference is going to be really successful.”

For more details about the IEEE DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition please visit their web site at www.newneb.org.

Article reprinted with permission

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HindlePower Your POWER Partner

HindlePower offers a broad array of products and application experience to support your specific dc power requirements.
 
In addition we believe it’s our obligation to take an active role in shaping the industry in which we reside. We continually contribute our time and talents in moving this industry forward by participating in a variety of educational and commercial organizations.
 
Here are some examples of HindlePower Employee involvement in our industry:
 

  • IEEE Membership. We have both senior membership and an active chair position on IEEE Battery Committee Working Group to harmonize NEMA PE-5 Utility Battery Charger Standard with a new IEEE Charger Standard.
  • Other IEEE activities include:
    - Gold Level Sponsorship in the IEEE NewNEB DC Utility Conference & Exhibition. This is a collaborative effort with the IEEE in reviving and updating a key industry event designed to address and resolve dc power issues within the utility industry.
    - Exhibiting at the IEEE-PES Transmission & Distribution Conference and Exhibition.
  • Active participation in meetings and committees for the adoption of NERC PRC-005 as it relates to batteries and chargers.
  • Working with NEMA on helping to re-evaluate and rewrite the NEMA PE5 Utility Battery Charger Standard.
  • Annual participation in Battcon by presenting topical papers, exhibiting products and networking with customers and suppliers.
  • Through our HindlePower University Programs we offer classroom instruction on dc power and applications. We also offer interactive webinars and on-site seminars to industry related groups for topics related to dc power and reliability. 
Our goal is to become a better “power partner” by offering higher quality, easy to use products and educational resources to better inform our customers.  Please let us know how we are doing, and any topics you wish to learn more about.

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World's first use of electric vehicle batteries for homes.
From Energy Central.com

Check out this article regarding GM and ABB’s venture in using your electric vehicle as an energy storage device for your home.

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NEWS June 2013

We're Honored.

HindlePower would like to proudly announce that it has received an excellence in business award from the Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce. Watch for for more about this prestigious honor in the July issue of HindlePower News. 

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IEEE/NEMA PE 5 SPECIFICATION WORKING GROUP SESSION ADDED TO NewNEB CONFERENCE

IEEE is pleased to confirm that a special Working Group Session will take place on Wednesday morning, October 9th following the New NEB conference taking place at the Holiday Inn Long Island at Islip Airport October 7 and 8.

IEEE and NEMA agree that a new Standard or set of Guidelines is long overdue to address the issues related to Battery Charging as it relates to the utility and industrial markets. Currently, NEMA PE 5 is the only reference material that relates to stationary battery chargers and does not cover many important aspects related to stationary battery installations.

IEEE and NEMA have also agreed that a joint collaborative effort to create a new standard is in the best interests of the user community. Users, manufacturers and others who have an interest in participating in the Working Group are encouraged to join in this session on October 9th.

Visit www.newneb.org for further details and to register for both the NewNEB Conference and/or the IEEE/NEMA PE5 Working Group Session.

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- PRESS RELEASE -
CALL FOR PAPERS
& NEW FLYER!

The NewNEB Conference & Exhibition Revised Show Flyer!

IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition
Scheduled for October 7th & 8th, 2013
Submit Papers to: papers@newneb.org
 
The IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition is devoted to topics important to the utility DC power industry. Product and development topics include batteries, battery chargers, control systems, diagnostics and testing, communications capabilities and much more.
 
The theme for this year’s conference will focus on system reliability and the influence of the NERC requirements in shaping the utility DC system.  We will draw from the industry at large including, regulators, utilities, manufacturers, educational institutions and consultants to provide qualified speakers. 

Important Dates & Deadlines:
Paper Submissions due by 7/8/2013
Paper Acceptances by 8/2/2013
Revision Submissions due by 8/26/2013
Acceptance Notification by 9/2/2013
Power-Point Submissions by 9/16/2013

Suggested Topics Include: 

  • DC System Reliability
  • NERC Compliance Challenges
  • Disaster Preparedness
  • Electronic System Security
  • Best Practices for System Maintenance
  • Battery Reliability Evaluations
  • Before and After the Storm – what do you do?
 
Call for Panels –
  • Panel discussions related to system reliability
  • NERC PRC-005, how to deal with the NERC and FERC Requirements
  • Battery technology vs. reliability
  • Best practices for split bus vs. redundancy
  • How to create a complex load profile
 
If you are interested in presenting, exhibiting, volunteering, sponsoring, or supporting this effort, please let us know.  You may E-Mail us directly at info@newneb.org or visit www.newneb.org for more details about all the various participation opportunities.
 
For more details about IEEE NewNEB, please visit us at www.newneb.org.

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Our Newly Revised
Formal Console Specification

In addition to our complete line of battery chargers, HindlePower offers custom engineered system products such as mobile power systems and fixed consoles/cabinets. In this June issue of our newsletter, we are pleased to offer our formal console specification. This document defines all aspects of product construction, features, options, and industry approvals. These versatile systems are custom designed and built for your specific requirements. They are rated for both NEMA 1 (indoor) and NEMA 3R installations. Here is our link to the console brochure.
 
Let us know if you have any questions or comments regarding this specification.

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Industry Happenings

Here is an article appearing in a blog by William P. Labbe, Jr., Senior Vice President of Corporate Accounts and Principal in Charge of TRC’s Renewable Energy Initiative. TRC is a national engineering, consulting and construction management firm providing integrated services to the energy, environmental and infrastructure markets. Mr. Labbe discusses some of the developing industry trends he views in areas of power generation and delivery, power company restructuring, regulation, and technology.

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IEEE SBC

At the previous IEEE SBC (Stationary Battery Committee) meeting, we began the process of working on a stationary battery charger standard to be issued by the IEEE.  Most of us have worked with NEMA PE5, the current utility industry standard.  However, the Committee is moving to replace this document with a new IEEE standard.  The NEMA PE5 standard is about 20 years old and has seen only minor updates over that time.  The Charger Working Group of the IEEE was recently formed and it is chaired by Art Salander of HindlePower. Haissam Nasrat of Primax is the Co-Chair and Tania Martinez Navedo of the NRC is Secretary.
Historically, the IEEE has had limited success in collaborating with NEMA to create a harmonized NEMA PE5 document with a new IEEE Utility Charger standard. Ongoing efforts will be made to encourage NEMA to join the IEEE on this project.

The IEEE SBC has begun to draft the language for the PAR and progress toward completing a Title & Scope.  A follow up Charger Working Group meeting is scheduled to occur in conjunction with the IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition.  The “conference” is scheduled for October 7-8, 2013. A special meeting will be held for the battery charger standard on Wednesday morning October 9th at the same venue.  Please visit www.newneb.org for more details or email Art Salander directly at art.salander@ieee.org.

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NEWS May 2013

The Cutting Edge #3

“Professional Manufacturing” is not just a buzzword here at HindlePower.  It’s our mantra.  We take pride in how our facility looks and operates.  To that end, we recently completed a “5S” program for one of our production lines, in an effort to improve manufacturing quality.
 
What is 5S and what does it mean? As defined by the EPA, “The 5S pillars, Sort, Set in Order, Shine,Standardize, and Sustain, provide a methodology for organizing, cleaning, developing, and sustaining a productive work environment. In the daily work of a company, routines that maintain organization and orderliness are essential to a smooth and efficient flow of activities. This lean method encourages workers to improve their working conditions and helps them to learn to reduce waste, unplanned downtime, and in-process inventory.”
 
We implemented 5S in our AT10.1 Group II and AT30 departments.  Every product or option was reviewed over a period of a few months.  Our goal was to increase quality, and reduce build time.  We realized to achieve this vision we needed to reduce our wasted labor and standardize as much as we could. We found that, on average, we would walk over a mile per charger build.  Searching for tools and materials was taking away from us doing our real jobs.
 
This process was completed several months ago.  Now that it’s implemented, no one can remember what the previous production process entailed.  The entire group now works on each unit as a team, checking every part of the build as we go. Sub-assemblies and wiring are stocked and kitted.  This process gives us advance warning when we are running low and needs to be reordered.  The 5S process allows us to be more efficient each and every day.
 
So, what does this mean to you, our customer?  5S manufacturing techniques allow us to streamline our process, resulting in reduced build times and faster shipping.  Your charger goes through a much more rigorous review process as it works its way down the production line.  When the unit reaches each station, the work from the previous station is inspected.  Once the charger is ready to ship, it has been checked and rechecked numerous times for production accuracy. This action results in a higher quality and more reliable product.

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- PRESS RELEASE -
CALL FOR PAPERS!

IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition
Scheduled for October 7th & 8th, 2013
Submit Papers to: papers@newneb.org
 
The IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition is devoted to topics important to the utility DC power industry. Product and development topics include batteries, battery chargers, control system, diagnostic and testing, communications capabilities and much more.
 
The theme for this year’s conference will focus on system reliability and the influence of the NERC requirements in shaping the utility DC system.  We will draw from the industry at large including, regulators, utilities, manufacturers, educational institutions and consultants to provide qualified speakers. 

Important Dates & Deadlines:
Paper Submissions due by 7/8/2013
Paper Acceptances by 8/2/2013
Revision Submissions due by 8/26/2013
Acceptance Notification by 9/2/2013
Power-Point Submissions by 9/16/2013

Suggested Topics Include: 
  • DC System Reliability
  • NERC Compliance Challenges
  • Disaster Preparedness
  • Electronic System Security
  • Best Practices for System Maintenance
  • Battery Reliability Evaluations
  • Before and After the Storm – what do you do?
 
Call for Panels –
  • Panel discussions related to system reliability
  • NERC PRC-005, how to deal with the NERC and FERC Requirements
  • Battery technology vs. reliability
  • Best practices for split bus vs. redundancy
  • How to create a complex load profile
 
If you are interested in presenting, exhibiting, volunteering, sponsoring, or supporting this effort, please let us know.  You may E-Mail us directly at info@newneb.org or visit www.newneb.org for more details about all the various participation opportunities.
 
For more details about IEEE NewNEB, please visit us at www.newneb.org.
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Utility Industry Happenings

As we enter the warmer months of the calendar, electric utilities are busy preparing for increased base-load and peak demand periods associated with electric cooling equipment.
 
Southern California Edison (SCE) is faced with an even more daunting summer season.
 
Two major electricity producing centers are currently off line – Huntington Beach (888MW gas fired) is off the grid because their air permits are expired.
In addition, the 2,150MW San Onofre nuclear power plant is shut down indefinitely following a report addressing alloys used in the steam generator segment of the plant.
 
Last week, SCE released a request to customers to develop and implement conservation efforts in case demand exceeds production.  SCE has plans to buy the required power for their customers, but have to address their distribution limitations – for more information on the specific construction plans, visit the article on Energy Central.
 San Onofre Nuclear Generation Station (SONGS)

San Onofre Nuclear Generation Station (SONGS)
--------------------------------------------
As more and more alternative energy producing facilities (wind, solar, bio-waste) come on line, serious consideration is being given on how best to store the electricity they produce. 
 
Driven by the obvious drawbacks to some renewable energy sources (the sun doesn’t always shine and the wind may not always blow), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have identified new and potentially ideal locations to implement Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) in massive underground basalt “caves” in Washington State and Oregon.
 
CAES is considered by some to be a serious competitor to more traditional high energy storage devices such as lead acid and large format lithium ion battery systems.  
 
To learn more about CAES and what researchers are considering, check out the article from Energy Central.

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NEWS April 2013

Revised AT30 Charger Brochure

We have now completed the AT30 Charger Brochure Revision. The hard-copy version has just been printed. Significant enhancements were made along with several corrections to ac input current data and weights & dimensions. You’ll notice we’ve included an expanded table containing ac input current values based on various input voltages as well as detailed information describing prominent AT30 options. The options section was created by integrating our former AT Series Accessories Brochure (JF5020) into this new AT30 brochure.

To make it easier to view this on the electronic version of the brochure, simply click anywhere on the table. This action creates a “snapshot” enabling you to reduce or enlarge the image to fit your PC screen. Give it a try. Here’s the link:JF5018 
 
We believe this revised brochure contains considerably more comprehensive and accurate information. Let us know what you think of the “new look.” Thanks.

You can view the brochure electronically to our website (www.hindlepowerinc.com).

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“Clickable” AT10 Sizing Chart
As you may have noticed, we have completely redesigned and enhanced our AT10 Battery Charger Brochure. You will see we have expanded the ac input current data as well as updated the weights and dimensions. All this information spans pages 8 and 9 in the brochure.
 
To make it easier to view this on the electronic version of the brochure, simply click anywhere on the table. This action creates a “snapshot” enabling you to reduce or enlarge the image to fit your PC screen.
 
Give it a try. Here’s the link: JF5006

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NEWS April 2013

Revised AT30 Charger Brochure

We have now completed the AT30 Charger Brochure Revision. The hard-copy version has just been printed. Significant enhancements were made along with several corrections to ac input current data and weights & dimensions. You’ll notice we’ve included an expanded table containing ac input current values based on various input voltages as well as detailed information describing prominent AT30 options. The options section was created by integrating our former AT Series Accessories Brochure (JF5020) into this new AT30 brochure.

To make it easier to view this on the electronic version of the brochure, simply click anywhere on the table. This action creates a “snapshot” enabling you to reduce or enlarge the image to fit your PC screen. Give it a try. Here’s the link:JF5018 
 
We believe this revised brochure contains considerably more comprehensive and accurate information. Let us know what you think of the “new look.” Thanks.

You can view the brochure electronically to our website (www.hindlepowerinc.com).

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“Clickable” AT10 Sizing Chart
As you may have noticed, we have completely redesigned and enhanced our AT10 Battery Charger Brochure. You will see we have expanded the ac input current data as well as updated the weights and dimensions. All this information spans pages 8 and 9 in the brochure.
 
To make it easier to view this on the electronic version of the brochure, simply click anywhere on the table. This action creates a “snapshot” enabling you to reduce or enlarge the image to fit your PC screen.
 
Give it a try. Here’s the link: JF5006

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HindlePower heading to Battcon
We are pleased to announce that HindlePower, Inc. will be exhibiting at the upcoming 17th annual Battcon®  International Stationary Battery Conference and Trade Show. The conference runs Monday to Wednesday, May 6th to May 8th 2013, at Disney’s Contemporary Resort, Orlando, Florida.

Battcon® is a three day, non-commercial, technical event for storage battery users from a broad range of industries. It is the premier conference for end-users, technologists, and manufacturers. The event features a two day trade show packed with storage power related vendors, plus optional seminars with CEU's awarded. Users, manufacturers of batteries and battery test equipment, installers, researchers, and standards and safety experts attend the conference to learn about and discuss the latest industry developments.

Here is the conference link for more information: BATTCON 2013
 
We look forward to seeing you there!

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IEEE NewNEB Update

Please mark your calendars and join us for the upcoming IEEE NewNEB DC Utility Power Conference & Exhibition to be held October 7 & 8, 2013 at the Holiday Inn in Hauppauge-Long Island, NY. This conference is specifically devoted to the reliability of DC power for the utility power industry including switchgear, T&D, generation, engine generators, renewable energy, and related disciplines.
www.newneb.org

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NEWS March 2013

The Cutting Edge #2

Welcome back to The Cutting Edge, your go-to guide for the tech-savviest happenings at HindlePower! 
 
This month our focus is QR codes.  Not sure what a QR code is?  You’re not alone!  A QR or Quick Response code is a specially designed barcode that can be scanned by a smartphone to bring you to a webpage, download an app, or trigger any variety of other computer operations.  You can find QR codes anywhere, from newspaper advertisements to orange juice cartons to the aisles of Wal-Mart.
 
So how do QR codes work?  To begin, simply scan the code with a smartphone. The code is typically a link to a website. It automatically redirects you to a particular webpage offering more information about the product or service to which the code is affixed.
 
We began placing a QR code on the front panel of our AT10 and AT30 chargers back in July of 2011.  Scanning the QR code takes you to the http://atseries.net/ website for detailed product information such as operations/maintenance manuals and standard electro-mechanical drawings.
 
Scan Me with your Smart device!.In addition to the AT Series Chargers, we added QR codes to our product brochures and operations manuals which sends you to our website: www.hindlepowerinc.com. This gives you access to a whole host of product information, service instructions and HindlePower Personnel contact information.
 
Still not sure exactly how our QR code can help?  Give it a try it and see for yourself!  If you have questions, please contact us to learn more.

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Lithium Batteries

The link below brings you to an article concerning lithium ion batteries in Electric Vehicle (EV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) applications.  Large format lithium ion manufacturers are relying heavily on a large volume markets (electric vehicle or RTU telecoms) converting to lithium ion batteries to drive the costs down to a level smaller markets would accept for lithium batteries. 
 
Link: High price of lithium-ion batteries won't die soon
 
News like this serves to keep the core standby applications satisfied with today’s lead acid or alkaline (Ni-Cd) products, as the main benefits of lithium technologies (energy density, cycle life and maintenance costs) don’t carry enough value to offset the high cost, in our humble opinion. Take a look and tell us what you think.

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Sales Training Date Change

HPUniversity
In our February 2013 Newsletter, we announced sales training dates for the second calendar quarter. Please note the open date of April 3 has been changed to April 4. If you are interested in this sales based, product and application training, please contact Janet Dougherty atjanet@hindlepowerinc.com or call her at 610-330-9000 Ext. 219.
 
The following dates are offered for your consideration:
 
Sales Training Dates: 

1st Quarter: April 4
2nd Quarter: June 5

Technical Training Dates:

1st Quarter: March 19 & 20
2nd Quarter: June 19 & 20

Additional dates will be added and included in our March Newsletter. If you would like to register or need additional information, please contact Janet Dougherty at 610-330-9000 ext. 219 or via email at janet@hindlepowerinc.com

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IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference & Exhibition


IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference and Exhibition Please mark your calendars and join us for the upcoming IEEE NewNEB DC Utility Power Conference & Exhibition to be held October 7 & 8, 2013 at the Holiday Inn in Hauppauge-Long Island, NY. This conference is specifically devoted to the reliability of DC power for the utility power industry including switchgear, T&D, generation, engine generators, renewable energy, and related disciplines.
www.newneb.org

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Special Announcement!

HindlePower named top workplace in the Lehigh Valley!

#1 Top Work PlaceWe are very pleased to announce that HindlePower recently grabbed top honors in the small company (50-124 employees)category as the number 1 top workplace in the Lehigh Valley of Pennsylvania. The Morning Call (one of our local newspapers) partnered with Philadelphia area research company, Workplace Dynamics, to conduct and review employee surveys. The firm surveyed companies and analyzed results of over 7,000 completed surveys representing 51 companies. The survey included 23 questions covering seven factors including:

My Work: Training, work/life balance
My Manager: Cares about concerns, helps learn and grow
My Pay and Benefits: Includes how employees work together toward a common cause
Direction: Where the company is headed, its values and leaders
Execution: Feeling appreciated and that their work is meaningful

In the end, it’s all about the people. To quote Bill Hindle, “When you appreciate the good, the good appreciates.” We are extremely proud of our accomplishment and wanted to share this award with you, our valued channel partner. Thanks for helping our organization continue to grow and prosper. This recognition would not have been possible without your support. Thanks again.

Click on the link to view a video clip (“Small Employer Award Winner” ) of the awards ceremony:

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NEWS February 2013

What does it mean to be a battery eliminator?

In response to many questions on this topic; most folks are asking about how a battery charger can call itself a battery eliminator and yet not perform like a battery? This is a great question. Unfortunately, the terminology "battery eliminator" is not as precise as it could be. Much like "duck sauce" is not made from ducks, "lobster sauce " has no lobster in it, or, as the late George Carlin would say "Why do we park on a drive way and drive on a parkway?" certain phrases are not always completely precise but their meaning needs to be understood just the same.

For battery chargers we have a few assumptions. First, the battery charger is there to charge the battery and operate the steady loads when the AC is on. If the charger were to operate the switchgear during an electrical outage, it then becomes the same as a battery. Therefore, if it were a battery, why call it a battery eliminator? We could just call the charger the battery too! Confusing? Not really! We must all agree that a battery charger is a battery charger and a battery is a battery! (Sigmund Freud would like that.)

Although certain applications may find it practical to use the charger to operate switchgear, this would not cause us to consider offering "switchgear operating curves" for our chargers. This effort would involve an added feature that we would neither be able to control nor predict performance. While it is true that in certain cases these unusual performances may occur, we would not provide that as part of our operating capability because there is no specific standard that determines how this works with consistency or repeatability.

The battery charger will operate as a power supply up to its current limit rating, within the confines of both the slow start circuit used to protect the load and battery, while operating within a step change rate that occurs within 200ms and 500ms. (See NEMA PE5, Section 5.10) We do not offer "switchgear use" curves to predict this because the battery capacitive reactance, resistances, load characteristics, and a host of other issues affect this performance.

Remember that in any battery/charger scenario the battery controls the bus voltage and the charger provides the current to maintain that voltage. What is sometimes requested of us is for the charger alone to operate switchgear, based on calculating a defined current performance with an unpredictable bus voltage in order to determine how much current I can get for how long. There is no equation to solve for this repeatedly or consistently because of the many variables involved.

Further issues exist when trying to operate an inductive device whose true current demands are not always readily available. Those solenoid devices used to operate switchgear can demand very large up front currents that the batteries will deliver but the charger cannot. These currents are not always clearly stated in the switchgear specifications and have been recorded to be as much as 10 times or more of the device's plate rating. The charger is limited to its current limit as the maximum output current available and initially when current limit is achieved the full voltage may not be available, further detracting from this as a viable and saleable possibility.

When exploring the issues of Constant Loads vs. Transient Loads the controls put onto a battery charger are very important features. If a utility type battery charger is not properly regulated it would go into overvoltage and/ or overcurrent, either of which could harm a battery or load. Therefore, if the charger could accommodate the potential wild swings that a battery can perform, then the charger could damage the battery because you need to include the fact that an increasing voltage is also possible from the charger.

The battery starts discharging at OCV (open circuit voltage) without any external energy source while the charger has the AC input to draw from. When a battery outputs, it outputs current, while the voltage trails off but a charger and/ or power supply that is not regulated would then output currents such that the voltage could exceed normal. The utility battery charger has what is known as a rectangular output making it uniquely qualified to use current to control voltage by means of regulation. The battery just outputs current while the voltage decays. These are two very different ways of operating.

Considering all the possible variables, we cannot provide a table to determine switchgear operation using only a battery charger. Said ability is fraught with downsides and will only cause problems in the long run. If a specifier believes that a certain charger will operate their switchgear then it must remain with the specifier to determine.

We have no way of testing, calculating, or determining all the possible variables that may or may not allow switchgear to operate off a battery charger without a battery connected. Unless the AC is on and the operating load falls within the confines of our advertised ability, where the desired current demand coupled with a slow start capability that includes step changes to occur within 200ms to 500ms up to but not exceeding our current limit level of 110% of rating, we cannot assure you that for this scenario switchgear will operate without a battery connected.

In the final analysis, the term battery eliminator just means that the charger may operate as a regulated power supply without the battery connected with the output ripple not exceeding the NEMA PE5 standards for amplitude. I hope this helps clear up some of these questions. However, if you still have more questions please let us know.

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IEEE NewNEB DC Utility Power Conference & Exhibition
IEEE NewNEB DC Power Utility Conference and Exhibition
Please mark your calendars and join us for the upcoming IEEE NewNEB DC Utility Power Conference & Exhibition to be held October 7 & 8, 2013 at the Holiday Inn in Hauppauge-Long Island, NY. This conference is specifically devoted to the reliability of DC power for the utility power industry including switchgear, T&D, generation, engine generators, renewable energy, and related disciplines.

See The Event Flyer Here! 












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HindlePower University (HPU) Announces Upcoming Training Classes

HPUniversity
HindlePower is offering sales and technical training sessions this year for both our authorized sales channels and end customers.
 
Sales training covers topics such as charger theory of operation/sizing and application, product overview, sales handbook and web based resource review, pricing and market segments served.
 
Technical training covers in-depth installation, hands-on operation, testing and troubleshooting techniques. At the conclusion of this course, participants are given certificates of completion designating them as authorized, factory-trained service personnel.
 
Both classes include lunch and a self-guided tour of our factory.  Attendees have an opportunity to meet  our entire  production team as well as our front office personnel. In an effort to minimize the impact on the participant’s time away from their normal work schedules, these classes are designed to be completed in one business day. Classes are provided at no charge. However travel expenses are paid by attendees.
 
The following dates are offered for your consideration:
 
Sales Training Dates:

1st Quarter: April 3
2nd Quarter: June 5

Technical Training Dates:

1st Quarter: March 19 & 20
2nd Quarter: June 19 & 20

Additional dates will be added and included in our March Newsletter. If you would like to register or need additional information, please contact Janet Dougherty at 610-330-9000 ext. 219 or via email at janet@hindlepowerinc.com.  

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International Energy and Sustainability Conference Announcement

HindlePower will participating in the upcoming International Energy and Sustainability Conference (IESC) to be held at Farmingdale State College in Farmingdale, NY on March 22, 2013.
                          
The theme of this year’s conference is "Renewables in Smart Grid Technology for a Sustainable Future". The conference will bring together the latest research and development works in energy and related topics, along with industrial and management issues and challenges. Experts in research as well as in industry will be invited to present the emerging technologies and future directions in their field. Prospective authors are invited to submit original technical papers for presentation at the conference. Conference content will be submitted for inclusion into IEEE Xplore as well as other Abstracting and Indexing (A&I) databases.
 
Art Salander will be speaking on stationary battery technology. In addition, HindlePower will have a table-top display in the exhibit area.

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NEWS January 2013

THE CUTTING EDGE

Welcome to The Cutting Edge, bringing you the latest innovations from HindlePower! Every month will feature a different topic, showcasing the newest product or feature that we have added to our line-up. We strive to be on the cutting edge of technology, allowing us to keep YOU, our customers, at the forefront of our industry. Read on to sample the hottest innovations from Easton, PA.

This month we are focusing on our mobile dc power system, otherwise known as our state of the art trailer system. Our systems are custom engineered to fit YOUR needs. They are perfect for any application, whether it’s emergency back-up, NERC compliance testing, or substation maintenance. And there are so many options from which to choose! We offer the most comprehensive trailer system on the market.

What sets us apart from the competition? HindlePower mobile power system engineers work with you from beginning to end to ensure that the final design is the way YOU want it. Each system is designed to meet your requirements, ensuring you get the features you demand. During design and manufacturing, we adhere to the same rigorous quality standards as the rest of our product lines. Each unit is built in our state of the art, professional production facility by a knowledgeable and dedicated team of professionals. Our craftsmanship is second to none.

As with all of our products, we custom engineer these systems to suit your needs. We are your engineering partners. Whether you need help in determining the best batteries for your application or deciding what kind of climate control you need, we are available for you. We have a proven and organized design utilizing such items as wire raceway and custom battery racks to keep everything neat and in its place.

Our patent-pending hip roof is standard on all of our trailers. The roof’s unique shape directs any hydrogen gas to the top of the trailer where it is first exhausted by roof-mounted static snorkel type vents as well as a forced-air ventilation fan mounted in the center of the trailer ceiling. The fan is controlled by both a hydrogen detector and a thermostat for heat dissipation.

The hydrogen detector is equipped with a contactor wired to the charger to initiate charger shutdown in the event the hydrogen concentration exceeds normal thresholds. Working together, all of these components ensure the safety of your people and equipment.

Safety is not just your concern, it’s ours as well. All trailers feature portable eye wash stations, first aid kits and fire extinguishers pre-mounted for quick access. Internal components are clearly labeled with engraved nameplates, including a laminated, wall-mounted system schematic for system layout and identification. A battery MSDS Sheet is included with all HindlePower equipment documentation. Optional spill containment safeguards all personnel in the unlikely event of electrolyte spillage, where applicable.

To see everything we have to offer check out our photo gallery or take a virtual tour of one of our Trailers. Better yet, come visit us in Easton and see us in action!

If you would like to discuss specific applications, please contact Gary Guagliardi, Director Sales & Marketing, at 610-330-9000 extension 223 or via email at garyg@hindlepowerinc.com.

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Proposal to re-write NEMA PE5, The Standard for Utility Battery Chargers

Report on the IEEE PES Stationary Battery Committee in Tucson, Az – Jan 2013:

We believe that we should begin this effort to create a new document that replaces the existing NEMA PE 5 which can be used as a specifier’s and purchaser’s reference that now would include all of the current desirable features. Further, we believe that this new document would be exclusively valuable to the IEEE SBC as that is where all of the expertise on all sides currently exists. During this meeting we offered a proposal to begin writing a document in the spirit of or harmonized with NEMA PE5. This is an important effort since the currently outdated NEMA PE5 is a reference document in several current IEEE documents such as IEEE 946 and IEEE 1375.

The reason for this proposal is several fold. First the existing document NEMA PE 5 was last reaffirmed in 2003. Since that reaffirmation many advances, changes, and considerations have presented themselves to the industry. Plus, certain desires by users are not met within the confines of the current document. Therefore, during the spring IEEE SBC meeting Art Salander proposed that we approach the NEMA organization to explore what could be done mutually to update this document. On Thursday, November 29th, 2012, Art Salander met personally at NEMA HQ in Washington, DC with Greg Winchester and several others involved in the group specific to NEMA PE5. During that meeting they reviewed some of the general deficiencies of NEMA PE5 and also mentioned certain features currently desired for utility battery chargers that are not mentioned in the NEMA PE5 standard.

Prior to Art Salander’s visit, the NEMA organization told us they polled their NEMA Power Electronics Section about rewriting NEMA PE5. Simply stated, none of their membership expressed an interest in funding such an effort at this time. It seems that most of the NEMA PES members are not involved in the mainstream manufacture of utility battery chargers.

The IEEE committee expressed interest in moving ahead and revising the NEMA PE5 Specification. This decision was made at their January 2013 meeting held in Tucson, AZ.

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2013 Webinar Schedule

HindlePower has a number of webinars planned this year. These 30 to 60 minute presentations will cover a variety of topics such as:

  •  Basic Charger Technology: Design Theory and Application
  •  Proper Charger Sizing and how it relates to IEEE Battery Sizing Requirements
  •  HindlePower Product Overview: Product Portfolio Details
  •  Battery Charger Spare Parts: Options and Accessories
  •  Circuit Breaker AIC Ratings and Applications
  •  AT Series SCADA Communications Option: Features and Benefits
These and other topics will be available this year. Stay tuned for posted dates and electronic invitations. If you would like to receive our upcoming webinar invitations, please forward your contact information to either Kyle Huggins (khuggins@hindlepowerinc.com) or Gary Guagliardi (garyg@hindlepowerinc.com). Finally, let us know if there is specific subject matter you would like us to cover. Thanks.”

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NEWS December 2012


NEW!!!! HindlePower Online Website Chat

Do you have a quick question or need some assistance? HindlePower is pleased to announce our new live chat line located on our website: www.hindlepowerinc.com. Simply click on the chat icon that appears on the bottom right hand corner of the screen to begin chatting. Your question will be answered by one our knowledgeable office personnel. It’s a quick and easy way to way to get basic product information or to be directed to a specific location on our website for detailed information.

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THANK YOU! from HindlePower's Leroy Wheeler

My name is Leroy Wheeler. I am an employee at HindlePower. I work in the magnetics department where I build the transformers and inductors for your battery chargers. I am writing this letter on behalf of the production team to thank you for your business with HindlePower. Here at HindlePower we work very hard as a team to make sure that our quality is at the highest level, and that our customers are satisfied with our products. Please accept our invitation for a plant tour or to meet the wonderfulHindlePower employees at our facility at 1075 Saint John Street, Easton PA. We truly love what we do and would love to share our experiences with you.

With the end of the year approaching we would like to take this opportunity to wish you and your family a Safe and Happy Holiday. 

Sincerely your friend,
Leroy Wheeler



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NEWS November 2012

3rd Party Agency Approvals Redux

The quagmire associated with 3rd party certifications can be very confusing. Many people are in doubt about what it really means to test a product and provide a 3rd party certification. Most Americans will request a UL listing without realizing that UL is an independent private company formed to provide fire safety standards for products manufactured in the United States. UL is not a government agency and has no official powers to regulate product merchantability, nor is it a preferred resource by OSHA.

As of this writing, OSHA is an agency of the US Government tasked with certifying independent testing laboratories in the USA for the purpose of providing 3rd party certifications. OSHA currently lists 17 laboratories as NRTL (NRTL – National Recognized Testing Laboratory). You may see the current list of NRTLs at http://www.osha.gov/dts/otpca/nrtl.

The NRTL Program recognizes private sector organizations as NRTLs, and recognition signifies that an organization has met the necessary qualifications specified in the regulations for the program. The NRTL determines that specific equipment and materials ("products") meet consensus-based standards of safety to provide the assurance, required by OSHA, and that these products are safe for use.

For many years HindlePower has used both CSA and UL for its safety testing. In recent times we have found said use to be redundant and since most of our safety testing has been performed through CSA, we have decided to drop any past and future testing with UL. This is a difficult, but no less important, decision. CSA is also a participant in OSHA's "Cooperative Arrangement between the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Standards Council of Canada (SCC)". This allows us to use a single point firm to provide both our Canadian and US domestic 3rd party certification thereby eliminating any duplication.

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What Would You Do? November 2012

What Would You Do! Part III

We last left Joe B. with a problem to check on his parallel 300A battery chargers. For most of their 15+ years of service, each charger put out about the same current, 110ADC, ± a couple percentage points – now, following an apparent interruption to the AC line feeding one of the chargers, Joe is trying to verify if BOTH chargers are operational because one charger is exhibiting a Charger Failure Alarm, and the other charger seems to be supporting the entire DC load!

Last month, Joe’s options were;

Shut the AC breaker to charger A, and see if charger B picks up the load
Open the DC output breaker on Charger A, again, to see if charger B picks up the load

Put charger B into equalize mode, making it have a higher output set point than charger A

Turn the float potentiometers down on charger A

Turn the float potentiometers down of charger B

The EXPERT'S TAKE!

Since charger A was now supplying all the load, and charger B is exhibiting a Charger Failure Alarm (on the older chargers, less than 2% of the nameplate current output)… 

Option 1 poses the most concern and potential biggest risk – while it seems both chargers were “live”, meaning they both had stable AC feeds now, Joe B hadn’t measured the output of charger B to see if it was actually delivering DC current - connected in parallel to the DC bus (i.e. Charger A and the batteries), Charger B’s output voltage wasn’t enough to make the gamble by shutting down Charger A.

Option 2 isn’t much different to Option 1, and isolating the known, fully functioning charger from the DC bus is a little too menacing a solution to feel good about.

Option 3, putting charger B into equalize, is a solid solution in that it works within the typical parallel charger operating principle of these chargers: the unit with the higher DC voltage setting will “lead” or assume as much of the load as it can, while the lower voltage-set charger “lags” behind. Also in this scenario, if Charger B is actually malfunctioning, Charger A will continue to support the DC bus – if after engaging the high-rate or equalize setting in Charger B it doesn’t assume the load, Joe B has some valuable intel!... This isn’t a 100% test, as some installations using Valve Regulated Lead Acid (VRLA) batteries arrange for the float and equalize charge settings to be the same! This is to minimize the amount of “over-charge” the VRLA batteries may experience. This was a popular practice about 10 years ago, so some additional insight could be useful.

Option 4 is in essence the same effect as Option 3 – it is, however, like trying to prove a negative. Meaning, at what point do you stop lowering Charger A’s output before deciding it’s mate is not operating properly? Too low a value, and the loads become supported by the battery, and additional alarms may result (Low DC voltage for instance). 

In this option however, if Charger B is working correctly, Joe would have seen it assume the load when its voltage setting was now higher than Charger A.

And finally, Option 5 is perhaps the lowest yield option in terms of deciphering any charger problems. 

If Joe B has remembered his charger training, he’ll execute Option 3, and:

Verify if Charger B is operational.

Mitigate any risk associated with defeating Charger A to force Charger B to work.

Come to the conclusion the “forced load sharing” feature is apparently not working properly, and most likely requires “recalibration”.


One important area Joe should verify before moving on to his solution revolves around the fact that older, analog control rectifiers often integrated a simple toggle switch on both chargers that featured forced parallel load sharing. Joe will ensure BOTH switches are turned to the ON position…

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Tech Tip: FIELD INSTALLATION OF THE AT SERIES COMMUNICATIONS MODULE (EJ5037-##)

The AT Series Communications Module is a standard product accessory, compatible with AT10.1 Group I, AT10.1 Group II, and AT30 Series microprocessor-controlled float battery chargers. This document (JD5008-00) is a service procedure for FIELD INSTALLATION of the communications kit (EJ5037-1#) into an existing charger. For full operation of the installed kit, please refer to the separate AT Series Communications Module user's manual (JA5011-04).

Read more… (JD5008-00)

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NEWS October 2012

What Would You Do
October 2012

WHAT WOULD YOU DO? Part II

Last month you met our utility technician Joe B, stuck on the overnight shift at a large fossil-fuel plant in Rhode Island. With the weather raging outside, Joe was confronted with a potential nightmare situation in his DC back up system

The 15 year old parallel, load-sharing, 300A silicon controlled rectifier-chargers keeping the main turbine back up batteries charged indicated an intermittent AC failure alarm, a charger failure alarm on one, and the chargers didn't appear be sharing the load any longer.

Joe was pretty much the sole technician working in I&C island and turbine back up, so he HAD to figure out what happened, and what he should do! He'd paid attention to previous seminars and training courses he attended, and knew that figuring out what happened tonight would involve a series of inspections, and eliminating potential causes.

The first thing Joe B did was to find the "installation and operating" (IOM) manual for the charger – he also made note of the serial number of the chargers. He knows that should he need to call them, having the serial number would let the manufacturer's technicians review all the relevant information about these specific chargers!

Joe could hear the words of the trainer from six months earlier in his head, and he knew straightaway there were facts he needed to check and record - the course of action NOW revolved around keeping the DC bus supplied, and mitigating any potential failure he could prevent.

Joe set to work and the first thing he verified was what the DC bus voltage was. The charge output meters indicated ~"130 something volts", but Joe remembered there's quite a distance between the chargers and the battery itself, so voltage drop because of the cable runs might make this reading different – using his digital multi-meter, Joe found the voltage at the battery terminals to be 133.6VDC, well within the range noted on the instruction card mounted on the wall above the battery.

Joe felt the surge of relief like the vise around his chest had finally been loosened – the batteries were still being charged!

This was critical for more than just the obvious reason – it confirmed at least one of the chargers was operating normally – he was grateful to the design engineer who thought to have the batteries charged by redundant chargers!
Verifying this eliminated the following potential problems:
• Tripped output breakers or blown fuses on the chargers
• Some form of charger / rectifier failure (he'd seen that happen in substations before)
• Loss of AC supply to both chargers, either because of AC breaker trip or loss of their AC feed.

Taking the time to verify this is an important step in the analysis of the problem – now, Joe could put the right level of urgency on his work, and set about restoring the DC system to its normal state, and provide any service technician he spoke with more information.

Joe then returned to the room the chargers were installed in, and compared the condition of each to its mate! One charger "A" was delivering nearly 225ADC, and had no alarm indications any longer. B-charger was showing the same voltage as A, but the output current meter was practically at zero amps? It normally read about 105 or 110A, where had its load gone?

For a minute, Joe thought about checking the DC distribution panel to see if B-charger's loads had been shed because the breakers were all open? This was odd, and Joe didn't remember ever seeing individual DC distribution panels…

Then it hit him, all the previous times he checked the DC system at the power plant, BOTH chargers were putting out about 110-115ADC, Joe chided himself for being impressed that system design engineers had been able to put just the right amount of DC loads on each charger to make them work at the same rate…, and suddenly it hit him, these TWO chargers were built to SHARE THE LOAD! There was some feature, or option on the chargers that "forced" the chargers to divide the load evenly – so why was one charger not putting out any current, and had all the DC load shifted to charger A?,it certainly seemed so, Joe checked the notes he made during the seminar he attended six months ago!

LEARNING BIT!!!!
Force load sharing – When two similar size chargers are connected to a common bus, they will operate just fine, with one charger likely supplying all of the load, while the other sits in reserve. This is determined by the charger voltage settings, the charger with the "higher" voltage setting will be the LEAD charger and supply all the needed current. The second charger appears to be ON, but not working, and that's sort of accurate – if the lead chargers ceases to operate, the other charger immediately assumes the load, and the operator doesn't see any change in state

The next good thing Joe did was look up the alarm condition he had seen – He quickly understood the brief AC failure alarm he'd seen was probably caused by a momentary disruption to the AC line feeding the charger – this made sense, and was easy enough to check out – Sixty seconds with the multi-meter showed that AC voltage was present. Joe deduced this was more than likely a momentary loss as AC supply, but all three phases were present now.

Remembering what he observed during the height of the storm, our friendly plant technician concluded that an AC disruption would have led to that charger's output being interrupted, could that have caused the still-existing charger failure alarm??? This, our intrepid hero determined, warranted more investigation, he consulted his notes…

Recognizing the chargers were set up to force load share, which they weren't now - they normally delivered about 110A each, as Joe recalled the location of the ammeter needle from pervious inspections, and that charger A now seemed to be supplying all the load, motivated him to look up "Charger Failure Alarm" in his manual. Here, he learned the charger would indicate a failure if the output current was below a certain percentage of the nameplate rating – in this case, 2% of the 300A charger, or 6ADC.

Charger B was nowhere near 6A output, so perhaps THAT was the problem - somehow, charger A became the "lead charger" in this system, and charger B the back up? What did this mean to the Forced Load Sharing feature, and just how, does Joe-B, verify that Charger B is operational and able to remain in service????

Joe contemplated this, and with his hands less steady than they'd been all night, and with all the best intentions in heart to keep his DC system in optimum form, he reached out to the front controls of charger B and flipped….:

WHAT WOULD YOU DO????

Joe's got to verify if Charger B is really failed, or exhibiting some other condition resulting in the "Charger Failure Alarm" indicator. The chargers are 300A, forced load share units, with each typically supplying about 110ADC to the bus – charger A now seems to have all that load, Joe believes his options to check out charger B are:
1. Shut the AC breaker to charger A, and see if charger B picks up the load
2. Open the DC output breaker on Charger A, again, to see if charger B picks up the load
3. Put charger B into equalize mode, making it have a higher output voltage setting than charger A
4. Turn the float potentiometers down on charger A
5. Turn the float potentiometers of charger B down

Send your answers and any other suggestions you might have for our friend Joe to whatwouldyoudo@hindlepowerinc.com, and look for the EXPERTS answer next month.

Also in next months "What Would You Do", advice from the experts at HindlePower on what information makes problem diagnosis fast, easy and fool proof!

Last month's winning Reader Answer came from wukevsr@aol.com who recommended Joe:
1. Verify the DC bus voltage was still stable and available
2. Check to see if the surge Joe experienced in the plant might have resulted in an AC feeder loss resulting in the AC alarm and charger failure.

Our readers make these stories all the more important, and thanks to his timely and solid response, we'll be sending some prizes wukesvr's way.

When sending "what you would do" responses, please be sure to include your full name, email address and method to reach you besides email so we have the address to send your prizes to.

Remember, all monthly winners are entered into the final drawing next Oct 1 for an I-Pad grand prize.


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IEEE Society announces the 2014 IEEE-PES Transmission and Distribution Conference and Exhibition


The next IEEE-PES T&D Conference and Exhibition will be held April 14-17, 2014 at McCormick Place Conference Center – West Hall in Chicago, IL. This venue is arguably the most prominent and important event in the Utility Industry. It brings together several hundred industry professionals for conference topics and exhibits focused on power transmission and distribution. HindlePower is already making plans to participate in this event. We look forward to seeing you there
.

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Tech Tip:
Field Installing Lighting Arrestor


In this month's tech tip, we offer field installation instructions for adding/replacing a lightning arrestor (or surge arrestor) in AT10 Group I (HindlePower Document JA0094-00), AT10 Group II (HindlePower Document JA0094-01) Chargers.

A lightning arrester is a device used to protect the battery charger's internal components from the potential damaging effects of high voltage surges caused by lightning or other input power abnormalities. The typical lightning arrester has a high-voltage terminal and a ground terminal. When a lightning surge travels along the power line to the arrester, the current from the surge is diverted through the arrestor, in most cases to earth.

If you are you using battery chargers in geographic areas prone to frequent lightning strikes, you may want to consider this option as a degree of protection against potential equipment failures due to high voltage to internal charger components.

NEWS September 2012

What Would You Do!

A brand new feature within HindlePower News where you can:

• WIN GREAT MONTHLY PRIZES AND BE ENTERED INTO THE GRAND PRIZE FINALE
• HAVE YOUR KNOWLEDGE & ABILITY RECOGNIZED BEFORE THE ENTIRE INDUSTRY,
• LEARN A FEW THINGS ALONG THE WAY…

HindlePower is happy to launch a new feature in our Newsletter!!! Beginning in this edition, we will introduce you to our friendly Operations Technician, Joe Baggadonuts, whois responsible for both substation maintenance and power plant operations for Whodathunkit Utilities!

Joe's not 100% trained yet, but he's logical, thoughtful, and eager to learn. This is good yet because it seems bad things always seem to happen during his overnight shift, compelling him to find the solution in an independent manner.

Through Joe's intrepid saga's, we hope you'll pick up some useful tips and insights on standby DC power, and particularly, batteries and battery chargers!

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What Would You Do???
September 2012


Joe Baggadonuts came off his "lunch" break around 2:15AM. He worked the overnight hours for Whodathunkit Utilities, the 30th largest power company in Rhode Island. He always arrived well after his immediate supervisor Ron Bewize left, and often found himself very much alone, just as he was tonight.

The ride in this evening was quiet, the weather was humid, but the weather woman promised cooler and drier conditions tomorrow. Would that mean storms in the overnight hours? Probably, because if some natural or even man-made event was going to befall Whodathunkit, it was going to happen on Joe's shift!

Joe was responsible for the plant maintenance and inspections this month – he didn't mind that, he rather enjoyed being in one place each night of the week. Substation operations pulled him in many directions each night, rushing from one end of the state to the other (Rhode Island at night??) Tthe Utility just wouldn't hire more people to make the job easier and safer.

While making his rounds on the DC back up system on Level 4 of the plant turbine deck, thunder exploded through the cavernous space, with lighting that forced Joe to shield his eyes and turn away!!! Catching his breath and finally settled enough to open his eyes, Joe was confronted by a slew of bright red alarm LED's indicating several alarm conditions on his two parallel 130VDC, 300A station battery chargers!!!!

Inching closer to the front panels, Joe noticed the ammeters weren't at the same deflection angle to each other! Odd, they BOTH always pointed to ten-o'clock (about 110A each), one had an AC Failure Alarm LED, but only for a few seconds and then it went OUT? And worst of all, one of the chargers actually showed the "CHARGER FAILURE ALARM" condition!!!!!

Joe remembered those nice people at HindlePower had given an operations and maintenance seminar at the substation depot earlier this year what did they say would cause this condition???? They cautioned the chargers were of the traditional analog design, and at fifteen years old, they might need some maintenance and care…. Joe felt the bottom of his stomach drop away, and that bologna sandwich felt like a 50lb boulder in there, resting his hands on the corner of the charger nearest the entrance door, he hung his head down between his shoulders and pondered WHAT DO I DO???

YOU can help Joe in his analysis and diagnose the potential problems. The chargers are 15 year old SCR type chargers, fed by separate 480VAC 3Ø 60Hz lines. Both are 130VDC, 300A with a slick alarm package monitoring AC input, High and Low DC voltage, Positive & Negative Ground faults, and Joe's biggest worry, the Charger Failure Alarm. The chargers operated in forced load sharing, and were connected to 1,800Ah flooded lead acid batteries, and can operate with or without the batteries connected…

What are Joe's options? What should he check first, and what conclusions can he make right now!

Email your suggestions to usand we'll review them for NEXT MONTH's NEWSLETTER – We'll provide answers from the "Experts" of HindlePower's, and the best answers from our readers!

Email your suggestions for Joe to whatwouldyoudo@hindlepowerinc.com by October 10, 2012 for consideration in next month's newsletter – and keep reading each month for The HindlePower-Expert's advice as well as the recommendations from you and your colleagues in the Utility Power Industry!!

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- TECH TIP -
Starting DC Motor Loads
with Stationary Battery Chargers


Many DC power systems include DC motors as part of the plant equipment. Both normal and emergency operations of the plant require starting the motors, usually under load. Such loads may include dc oil pumps, etc.

If dc motor starting is a routine part of plant operation, special considerations may be required for interfacing the stationary battery charger to the dc power system. continue reading...

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Next Webinar: Mobile DC Power Systems

HindlePower is pleased to announce its second educational webinar entitled Mobile DC Power Systems is slated for September 25, 2012. We will be offering two sessions of this event in order to accommodate as many participants as possible. The webinar will be held at both 10:00am & 3:00pm Eastern Standard Time.

The presentation will be in Microsoft PowerPoint Format. The discussion will center around product definition and applications. During this presentation, we hope to answer the following questions:

What is a mobile DC Power system?

What are the most common applications for these systems?

How can these systems assist in dc system maintenance for NERC compliance requirements?


This event will be hosted by Gary Guagliardi, HindlePower's Director of Sales & Marketing. We would like this venue to be as informative and interactive as possible. To do so, we urge you to ask questions and offer your comments during this hour-long presentation. Thanks. We look forward to your participation.

Link to Webinar registration:
AM Session (10:00am)
PM Session (3:00pm)
Mobile DC Power System Product Brochure

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Announcing HindlePower's support for the NewNEB Conference,
Scheduled for October 7th & 8th, 2013.

Art Salander, known for developing www.powerqualityadvisors.com the utility industry web and blog site specifically devoted to the DC power utility industry is using this site and expertise to organize the NewNEB Conference. This symposium, scheduled to debut in the fall of 2013 and will be an annual industry specific event that spans 2 days. The entire event will be devoted to those topics important to the utility DC power industry. The projected program will have several key elements: they include courses and seminars, presentations, and product introductions that are important to the DC portion of the utility industry. Interested industries include switchgear, T&D, generation, engine generators, renewables and all related disciplines. To see a preview of this program please follow this link: http://www.powerqualityadvisors.com/id38.html

The theme for our first conference will be based on the influence of the newly forming NERC requirements in shaping DC system reliability and maintenance.

The idea for this event was inspired by the old Northeast Battery Conference which used to occur in Albany, New York on an annual basis. Art Salander, who has been devoted to this industry for almost 40 years, decided it was time to bring this event back to the industry! According to Art, he observed that this corner of the battery industry needed a place and an event to truly call its own. Art has stated, "Those of us who have worked long and hard in the utility DC power industry need an event where we can share our ideas and technology exclusively. This will be that event!"

If you are interested in presenting, exhibiting, volunteering, sponsoring, or supporting this effort please let Art know. You may E-Mail him directly at newneb@powerqualityadvisors.com or visit www.powerqualityadvisors.com for more details about the various sponsorship and participation opportunities.

NEWS August 2012

- TECH TIP -
AT10 / AT30 Preventative Maintenance Procedure

We are frequently asked what the maintenance requirements are for our AT Series Battery Chargers.

Here is a link to take you to our document JD0064-00. This handy checklist offers relatively simple tasks and visual inspections to perform to help keep your chargers operating virtually maintenance-free for many years. This document is located on our web-site under "Service Instructions." Let us know if you have any questions or would like additional detailed information.

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HindlePower Website Updates

Our website has a new look. Check out the home page. (www.hindlepowerinc.com) We have added several icons to quickly take you to some of the most frequently visited pages of our site.

In addition, we have started creating photo galleries to give you a more detailed look at our products. These galleries are a work in progress and we will be adding several in the coming weeks. Our goal is to offer a complete photo portfolio of all our products.

Currently, we have galleries depicting our Mobile DC Power System and The EPIC Series Console. Check them out and let us know what you think.
The EPIC Series Console Gallery
Mobile DC Power System Gallery

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EPIC Series Console Guide Specification

As you know, there are two custom engineered system-level products HindlePower offers. One is our Mobile DC Power System and the other is our EPIC Series Console. The “console” consists of one or more modular cabinets designed to contain battery chargers/power electronics, batteries, dc distribution and other ancillary equipment. They are pre-engineered, designed and built to meet your specific requirements.

Our consoles comply with NEMA 3R (outdoor) and NEMA 1 (indoor) applications. They also meet the IEEE-693 Specification governing seismic zone 4 requirements.

View the Console Guide Specification

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Next Webinar: Mobile DC Power Systems

HindlePower is pleased to announce its second educational webinar entitled Mobile DC Power Systems is slated for September 25th 2012. We will be offering this event at two different times to accommodate as many participants as possible. The webinar will be held at both 10:00am & 3:00pm Eastern Standard Time.

The presentation will be in Microsoft PowerPoint Format. The discussion will center around product definition and applications. During this presentation, we hope to answer the following questions:

What is a mobile DC Power system?

What are the most common applications for these systems?

How can these systems assist in dc system maintenance for NERC compliance requirements?


This event will be hosted by Gary Guagliardi, HindlePower's Director of Sales & Marketing. We would like this venue to be as informative and interactive as possible. To do so, we urge you to ask questions and offer your comments during this hour-long presentation. Thanks. We look forward to your participation.

Link to Webinar registration:
AM Session (10:00am)
PM Session (3:00pm)
Mobile DC Power System Product Brochure

NEWS July 2012

Announcing HindlePower's support for the NewNEB Conference,
Scheduled for October 7th & 8th, 2013.

Art Salander, known for developing www.powerqualityadvisors.com the utility industry web and blog site specifically devoted to the DC power utility industry is using this site and expertise to organize the NewNEB Conference. This symposium, scheduled to debut in the fall of 2013 and will be an annual industry specific event that spans 2 days. The entire event will be devoted to those topics important to the utility DC power industry. The projected program will have several key elements: they include courses and seminars, presentations, and product introductions that are important to the DC portion of the utility industry. Interested industries include switchgear, T&D, generation, engine generators, renewables and all related disciplines. To see a preview of this program please follow this link: http://www.powerqualityadvisors.com/id38.html

The theme for our first conference will be based on the influence of the newly forming NERC requirements in shaping DC system reliability and maintenance.

The idea for this event was inspired by the old Northeast Battery Conference which used to occur in Albany, New York on an annual basis. Art Salander, who has been devoted to this industry for almost 40 years, decided it was time to bring this event back to the industry! According to Art, he observed that this corner of the battery industry needed a place and an event to truly call its own. Art has stated, "Those of us who have worked long and hard in the utility DC power industry need an event where we can share our ideas and technology exclusively. This will be that event!"

If you are interested in presenting, exhibiting, volunteering, sponsoring, or supporting this effort please let Art know. You may E-Mail him directly at newneb@powerqualityadvisors.com or visit www.powerqualityadvisors.com for more details about the various sponsorship and participation opportunities.

NEMA PE 5, it is about time
we updated this standard.

NEMA PE5 is the specification standard used throughout the US utility industry as the standard for utility type battery chargers. It has been almost 10 years since NEMA PE5 has been updated. We believe that not only does this need updating but it should be a part of the IEEE standards, too.

During the IEEE Stationary Battery Committee, June 24th – 28th , Art Salander proposed approaching NEMA to see if they would like to join the IEEE in creating a mutual standard. Most members of the IEEE Stationary Battery Committee seemed to agree that this work should be done. Since that meeting Art has begun the effort of contacting NEMA to see if NEMA is interested in working with the IEEE in concert, to create a mutual standard

While battery charger technology is advancing rapidly and many utilities are looking to the battery charger to help alleviate some of their NERC PRC-005-02 requirements this effort is extremely relevant. Interestingly enough, very little in PRC-005-02 discusses the battery charger itself however most utilities have been looking toward the charger producers for answers to some of their compliance issues.

What do you think?

Should we be looking toward the battery charger for answers?

Should another resource be tapped?

Do you think NEMA PE5 should be updated?

Perhaps you agree that NEMA PE 5 should really become an IEEE Stationary Battery Committee, Power Engineering Society document?

Please E-Mail your answers, ideas, and comment to asalander@hindlepowerinc.com and we will publish some of them in our next newsletter.

Also, let us know if you would like to work with us on this effort and we will tell you how you can get involved

NEWS June 2012

HindlePower Design Engineer
Visits Sierra Leone On Mission Trip

HindlePower design engineer Jim Butt recently (May) returned from a mission trip to Sierra Leone. Jim is a member of Engineers Without Borders - Lehigh Valley Professionals Chapter (EWB-LV).

The chapter has been working on the rehabilitation of the Centennial Secondary School (CSS) in Mattru Jong, Sierra Leone. CSS presently has a student population of approximately 1500. CSS was devastated during the decade long civil war which left the school with no running water, no electricity and no sanitary system.

Jim made the trip (his first) along with two other engineers to Sierra Leone with the primary goal of drilling a bedrock well for the school. Jim has previously worked with other engineers on the design of a three classroom solar lighting system that was installed during an EWB-LV trip in November 2011.

His participation on this trip was to check on the performance of the solar lighting system and to begin the design of a solar powered water pumping system that will be installed in early 2013. The well was drilled successfully, and the solar lighting system is performing above expectations. Jim also helped on the installation of some sanitary systems for the faculty. Jim's trip was sponsored in part by HindlePower, with the company also making a generous donation towards the purchase of equipment for the solar water pumping system.




30mVrms Ac Ripple and our 130 Vdc Chargers

With regard to our 130VDC charger product specifications, here is where we currently stand on 30 mV RMS ac ripple. Our sales literature and product specifications currently list:

SCR/SCRF
– designed and tested to NEMA PE5-1983
30 mV RMS ac ripple for standard filtered units WITH battery connected
85 mV RMS ac ripple for battery eliminator units WITHOUT battery connected

AT10.1/AT30 Series – designed and tested to NEMA PE5-1996
100 mV RMS ac ripple for standard filtered units WITH battery connected
100 mV RMS ac ripple for battery eliminator units WITHOUT battery connected

Where approval drawings for 130Vdc battery chargers requiring a maximum 30 mVrms ac ripple are required, customers often request this "30 mVrms" appear on the data nameplate for ac ripple. In these instances we have four (4) part number identifiers for our various models noted as sale order line items:

LINE ITEMS
EJ5004-70 Special SCRF-E 130Vdc Output Filter, 30 mV RMS at battery
EJ1072-60 Special AT10.1 G1 130Vdc Output Filter, 30 mV RMS at battery
EJ5023-60 Special AT10.1 G2 130Vdc Output Filter, 30 mV RMS at battery
EJ5057-60 Special AT30 130Vdc Output Filter, 30 mV RMS at battery

If you have any questions concerning ac ripple or any other topics, please don't hesitate to contact us.


NEWS May 2012

IEEE PES T&D Show and Battcon
2012 Reflections

May was a busy month as HindlePower was in attendance at the IEEE Transmission & Distribution Conference in Orlando FL as well as presenting white papers and exhibiting at Battcon in Hollywood FL.

The IEEE-PES T&D Exhibition was May 8-10. This is the premiere Utility Transmission & Distribution Conference held every two years. Conference papers ranged from smart grid and high voltage DC systems to disaster recovery – the key note address was delivered by Lloyd M Yates, President and CEO of Progress Energy.

Over 16,000 registered attendees representing 87 countries converged at the Orange County Convention Center.

HindlePower was one of 722 exhibitors at the trade show. We featured both our custom Mobile DC Power System (JF5041) and EPIC Series Console (JF5043) products.

It was great to see so many partners and friends stop by our booth. Utility and industrial user attendance was particularly heavy throughout the 3-day exhibit. This is particularly beneficial to our customers and partners, as we get the opportunity to hear directly from the users of our products; their invaluable insight helps shape and mold product enhancements and foster new product ideas.

We also participated in Battcon, held in Hollywood, FL on May 15-17. The Battcon™ International Stationary Battery Conference and Trade Show is a three day, noncommercial, technical event for storage battery manufacturers and users from a broad range of industries. With a unique format of daylong technical sessions and evening exhibit hours, it's one of the foremost conferences for end-users, technologists, and manufacturers involved with stationary batteries and their applications.

In addition to exhibiting in the trade show, HindlePower presented two white papers during the technical sessions. Matt Theriault gave a thought provoking paper on battery chargers and why we equip them with several unnecessary options. There was a lot of head nodding in the audience as attendees digested the insights of 30 ayear veteran of battery charger design.

Gary Guagliardi gave a talk with a detailed PowerPoint ™ presentation on Mobile DC Power Systems and their versatility for a variety of utility applications, including back-up power for substation maintenance, NERC compliance verification, black-start / recovery, or as a redundant dc station power system.

Battcon is a well-attended, structured event that helps keep HindlePower up-to-date with the latest developments in the stationary battery arena

Webinars

HindlePower is pleased to announce launching its first in a series of educational webinars. Covered topics will include battery charger theory of operation, product overviews, applications, how chargers interact with batteries and DC loads, technical trouble-shooting and cost-conscious-value-engineering or "how to properly equip your charger without breaking the bank," among others.

Sessions can be arranged for individual organizations or even companies with nationwide locations, offering a valuable resource to your team at a very economical cost!

Our first webinar will be held Monday - June 18th, AM & PM sessions.

Title: Demystifying the SCR Type Microprocessor Based Battery Charger.

Ever wonder how all the charger features actually work? Want to know what YOU need to know to specify and quote a battery charger?

We at HindlePower will answer these questions and much more during this first webinar which will focus on Battery Charger Application Engineering.

This event will be hosted by Art Salander, who promises that the presentation will appeal to all levels of ability and knowledge.

Be on the lookout for your invitation and sign-in instructions.

Again, we will offer both a morning and afternoon session on Monday the 18th to accommodate busy schedules.

If you have any advance questions or topics of interest, please contact Art Salander (asalander@hindlepowerinc.com), Roy Gates (rgates@hindlepowerinc.com) or Gary Guagliardi (garyg@hindlepowerinc.com).

NERC Standard PRC-005-2: UPDATE!

As noted on the NERC web-site (http://www.nerc.com): "The purpose of standard PRC-005 is to ensure all power transmission and generation protection systems affecting the reliability of the Bulk Electric System (BES) are maintained and tested."

See this link regarding the latest PRC-005 revision

You will notice there is very little information specific to the battery chargers used in these BES applications. As we become more involved and immersed in NERC, we will be exploring and sharing our thoughts on its implications to our products. More on this will be discussed in future issues of this newsletter.

HindlePower's "WHAT WOULD YOU DO"?

Watch for future newsletters that introduce real life scenarios our technicians, engineers and commercial support team encounter every day, and leave the "rest of the story" for you, our readers to write, by submitting what you would do in that situation!

We'll acknowledge the best responses each month in our newsletter and enter you for a grand prize at the end of the series. Monthly awards are available too!

Tech Tip: Service Instructions

At HindlePower, we strive to provide first class customer service both before and after the sale. Our primary "after the sale" source of this service includes technical support. This no charge service involves both telephone and email assistance. We also offer a web-site based library of the most recent service instructions and application notes. This on-line resource provides detailed information regarding installation/operations procedures, product upgrades and trouble-shooting tips.

You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader, which you can download for free at Adobe.com.
Link: http://www.hindlepowerinc.com/serviceinstructions.html


NEWS April 2012

NERC Task Force Meeting,
April 17 - 19, 2012

By: Art Salander
Application Engineering/Business Development
Senior Member - IEEE

HindlePower's Art Salander and Nic Hindle attended the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Task Force Meeting held in Fort Worth, TX. The one and half day session titled "Project 207-17" drew attendees from utility system protection departments representing approximately eighteen (18) utilities, plus members of the IEEE Power Engineering Society, Stationary Battery Committee

Under the watchful guidance of the "Protection System Maintenance and Testing Standard Drafting Team", participants focused on NERC Standard PRC-005, Protection System Maintenance. The stated goal of the meeting was clarifying the practices and outcomes of battery maintenance, and adopting the guidelines agreed upon in committee. Unapproved to date, the draft has been reviewed and re-reviewed for about 4 years - the committee is intent on getting it approved this time around

PRC-005, in its latest form, is about 28 pages in length. You can find the latest revisions prior to this meeting at: http://www.nerc.com/filez/standards/Protection_System_Maintenance_Project_2007-17.html

It's important to note that PRC-005 is the document resulting from the Protection System Maintenance Project 2007-17 and that PRC-005 is neither any form of battery nor battery charger standard. Batteries (and to an even lesser extent battery chargers) are mentioned within this standard as a series of tables with items to be checked or verified to ensure that the BES (Bulk Electrical System) is reliable.

The mission of the committee is to develop a list of what actions, including a timetable, are necessary to perform battery maintenance for predicting operability. It's noteworthy that these actions do not specifically state how these actions are to be executed. The committee intends to draft a secondary document of guidelines outlining how these actions should be carried out. However, these "how to" guidelines are recommended practices, not a mandate. Further, the committee intends on setting a minimum requirement for battery system monitoring that is both palatable to the utility industry while also satisfying the battery manufacturers.

With specific regard to PRC-005 there are only a few tables related to batteries and chargers. Tables related to the battery systems are as follows:
Table 1-4(a) – Vented Lead Acid
Table 1-4(b) – Valve regulated Lead Acid
Table 1-4(c) – NiCad
Table 1-4(f) – Lists all of the verifications for each of these tables that may be automated. For every item you can prove you electronically monitor, say with a battery charger, and negate the need to physically verify that item.

(Interestingly, there are no battery charger specific tables. Each referenced battery system table contains a 4 month requirement to verify "float voltage of battery charger").

Using the current NERC standard, HindlePower Battery Chargers allow you to eliminate the monitoring of the following by physical verification:
• Verification of the dc supply voltage
• Inspection for unintentional grounds
• Verification of the float voltage of the battery charger

Although the meeting highlighted remaining issues to work out with regard to battery monitoring, we believe the committee will resolve them with an agreeable solution.

Further, it is our opinion that the IEEE Power Engineering Society, Stationary Battery Committee will continue to add practical solutions and recommended practices to the requirements stated by NERC.

For questions, comments, or additional information please contact:
Art Salander
(P) 631-462-2739
(C) 631-806-0302

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Hindlepower is Thinking Green


In celebrating Earth Day here is a list of HindlePower's Green-Team Accomplishments for 2011. HindlePower takes great pride in it's continual evolution towards becoming green.

HindlePower's Green-Team Accomplishments for 2011
:

  • Increased awareness and education concerning Single Stream recycling for paper, cardboard, glass, cans, paperboard, all plastics

  • Continued Recycling printer cartridges and toner cartridges through Staples (120+ cartridges in 2011)

  • Renegotiated 100% Green power (electric)

  • Installed Waterless urinal (office men's room)

  • Started Coffee grounds composting in garden

  • Solicited input from plant on items to recycle – received Nomex and zip-ties

  • Contacted supplier and manufacturer on recycling Nomex

  • All E-waste disposed properly (computers, monitors, fluorescent tubes)

  • Used batteries disposed properly

  • Initiated Scrap circuit boards recycling

  • Plastic bags recycled "Bags to Benches" (Earned first bench!)

  • Began recycling of blue protective plastic and shrink wrap

  • Initiated Thumb Drives to replace paper sales binders

  • All applicable documents are now printed double-sided

  • Created signs for recycling

  • Held plant-wide pizza party for increased recycling efforts

  • Solicited two bids on company-wide re-lamping effort

  • Involved MRC in company-wide Green "gap analysis"

  • Purchased "blue bins" for recycling

  • Purchased 2 large "green bins" for receiving and recycling collection

  • Purchased large "dump bin" for recycled materials

  • Investigated Scrap wood recycled into mulch

  • Investigated Pallets recycled as pallets or mulch

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What does it mean to be a battery eliminator?

By: Art Salander
Application Engineering/Business Development
Senior Member - IEEE

In response to many questions on this topic; most folks are asking about how a battery charger can call itself a battery eliminator and yet not perform like a battery? This is a great question unfortunately the terminology "battery eliminator" is not as precise as it could be. Much like "duck sauce" is not made from ducks, "lobster sauce "has no lobster in it or as the late George Carlin would say; "Why do we park on a drive way and drive on a parkway?" certain phrases are not always completely precise but their meaning needs to be understood just the same.

For battery chargers we have a few assumptions, first the battery charger is there to charge the battery and operate the steady loads when the AC is on. If the charger were to operate the switchgear during an electrical outage it then becomes the same as a battery. Therefore, if it were a battery why call it a battery eliminator? We could just call the charger the battery too; confusing? Not really! We must all agree that a battery charger is a battery charger and a battery is a battery! (Sigmund Freud would like that.)

Although certain applications may find it practical to use the charger to operate switchgear this would not cause us to consider offering "switchgear operating curves" for our chargers. This effort would involve an added feature that we would neither be able to control nor predict performance. While it is true that in certain cases these unusual performances may occur, we would not provide that as part of our operating capability because there is no specific standard that determines how this works with consistency or repeatability.

The battery charger will operate as a power supply up to its current limit rating within the confines of both the slow start circuit used to protect the load and battery while operating within a step change rate that occurs within 200ms and 500ms. (See NEMA PE5, Section 5.10) We do not offer "switchgear use" curves to predict this because the battery capacitive reactance, resistances, load characteristics, and a host of other issues affect this performance.

Remember, in any battery/charger scenario the battery controls the bus voltage and the charger provides the current to maintain that voltage. What is sometimes requested of us is for the charger alone to operate switchgear, based on calculating a defined current performance with an unpredictable bus voltage in order to determine how much current I can get for how long? There is no equation to solve for this repeatedly or consistently because of the many variables involved.

Further issues exist when trying to operate an inductive device whose true current demands are not always readily available. Those solenoid devices used to operate switchgear can demand very large up front currents that the batteries will deliver but the charger cannot. These currents are not always clearly stated in the switchgear specifications and have been recorded to be as much as 10 times or more of the device's plate rating. The charger is limited to its current limit as the maximum output current available and initially when current limit is achieved the full voltage may not be available, further detracting from this as a viable and saleable possibility.

When exploring the issues of Constant Loads vs. Transient Loads the controls put onto a battery charger are very important features. If a utility type battery charger is not properly regulated it would go into overvoltage and or overcurrent either of which could harm a battery or load. Therefore, if the charger could accommodate the potential wild swings that a battery can perform then the charger could damage the battery because you need to include the fact that an increasing voltage is also possible from the charger.

The battery starts discharging at OCV (open circuit voltage) without any external energy source while the charger has the AC input to draw from. When a battery outputs, it outputs current, while the voltage trails off but a charger and or power supply that is not regulated would then output currents such that the voltage could exceed normal. The utility battery charger has what is known as a rectangular output making it uniquely qualified to use current to control voltage by means of regulation. The battery just outputs current while the voltage decays. These are two very different ways of operating.

Considering all the possible variables, we cannot provide a table to determine switchgear operation using only a battery charger. Said ability is fraught with downsides and will only cause problems in the long run. If a specifier believes that a certain charger will operate their switchgear then it must remain with the specifier to determine.

We have no way of testing, calculating, or determining all the possible variables that may or may not allow switchgear to operate off a battery charger without a battery connected. Unless the AC is on and the operating load falls within the confines of our advertised ability, where the desired current demand coupled with a slow start capability that includes step changes to occur within 200ms to 500ms up to but not exceeding our current limit level of 110% of rating, we cannot assure you that for this scenario switchgear will operate without a battery connected.

In the final analysis, the term battery eliminator just means that the charger may operate as a regulated power supply without the battery connected with the output ripple not exceeding the NEMA PE5 standards for amplitude. I hope this helps clear up some of these questions. However, if you still have more questions please let us know.

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GROUND DETECTION IN THE REAL WORLD

Power plants and substations are initially clean and free of grounding material. As time passes, dirt and other contaminants pervade their environments. Batteries, often stored unprotected, can spill electrolyte onto the support racks and enclosures. This conductive electrolyte, combined with carbon dust and other conductive material, can cause an imbalance and a ground fault.

Placing two (2) battery chargers together onto one battery is a common way to achieve a higher level of redundancy on the dc bus. This configuration also connects two (2) ground detection circuits in parallel, simultaneously cutting the detection sensitivity in half and doubling the current flow from the battery to building ground. A quick way to restore sensitivity is to disable the ground detection circuit on one of the battery chargers. Some dc bus configurations can create a false ground fault when more than one type of ground detection circuit is connected to the system. An imbalance can also be created in applications where two (2) batteries/chargers are tied together at the negative (-), with two (2) separate positive (+) feeds to the separate loads. Each battery charger contains its own ground detection alarm circuit which is in parallel with the negative (-), but not with the positive (+)....continue reading

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- TECH TIP -
New Temperature Compensation Feature R1


Temperature compensation is a feature most charger manufacturers offer that includes some form of temperature sensing device and a circuit that adjusts the charger output voltage according to the temperature near or at the battery

The existing temperature compensation works as follows:
1. When the charger powers up, the temp probe is detected.

2. If a probe is detected, the display will flash nicd or Lead to indicate NiCd or Lead compensation.

3. The voltage display will always display a compensated value, i.e. the value that would appear at 25C (77F). This value will almost always be different from the actual output voltage. If the charger were controlling perfectly, it would display 131.0 for a 131.0 setpoint.

4. The software alarm points (HVDC and LVDC) will move with temperature.

If the float is 131.0 and the HVDC is set to 136.0, the HVDC alarm will not trip unless the output is 5 volts above the float setpoint. This means that if the actual output is at 135.0 due to temperature compensation, the HVDC alarm will not trip until 140.0 actual output. (JD5003-00 incorrectly states that the alarms do not move). ...continue reading

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NEWS March 2012

AT10 Series Battery Charger Update

Please note we have revised our AC input current values for the AT10.1 Series Battery Charger. The brochure on our web-site (www.hindlepowerinc.com) contains these updated ratings. We are currently revising our printed literature and will advise when the new brochures will be available.

In addition, we areworking on revising and updating our AT30 Series Charger's ac input current values. These changes will appear first on the electronic version of our literature, followed by the new printed brochure. We will keep you informed as to when the revised brochure will be completed.

In the interim, please refer to our engineering document DC5016-00 for the most up-to-date ac input current values for both the AT10.1 and the AT30 Chargers. We appreciate your patience while we make these important changes.

If you have any questions, please contact us at 610-330-9000.

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Charger Buzz – NERC and Smart Grid
There are No NERC approved battery chargers!

By: Art Salander
Application Engineering/Business Development
Senior Member - IEEE


In recent months we have heard a lot about NERC and Smart Grid. Most people wonder if these are related topics? The answer is yes, they are very much related. In both cases, the end result of compliance is more reliable power. NERC specifically deals with reliability for reliability's sake while Smart Grid technologies provide for a more holistic approach to our energy needs.

NERC has once again released (August 2011) another version of PRC-005 which deals with DC issues. Actually, PRC-005 centers on the entire Protection System where the DC portion is a small part of that concern. In any event, another NERC meeting will be held next month in Fort Worth, Texas to further explore the compliance issues related to PRC-005. The point of this meeting is to further progress the intention of PRC-005 and the DC battery related portion which has not been changed all that much for the last few revisions.

Regarding PRC-005, battery chargers are only mentioned as a device to be checked every 18 months for the accuracy of their float voltage. The other items related to the battery charger, but not specifically associated with the battery charger itself, deal with the charger's ability to output, overall system voltage, and ground fault monitoring. There is no other mention of the battery charger or its functions in PRC-005. Yet, while some battery charger manufactures have claimed that their chargers "meet NERC requirements," the fact is that no battery chargers, monitors, or any other devices are approved for use by NERC. NERC has yet to even finalize their requirements for DC monitoring! The concept of NERC compliant products is both overstating any real capability while assuming a compliance that does not even exist!

It is important to note that when comparing the HindlePower AT products to the NERC proposed requirements, you can see how our products could help you meet your NERC requirements based on a utility's plan for reliability. Our standard alarms and ability to provide both DNP and MODBUS communications, which includes complete control and monitoring, is a very effective way to aid in NERC compliance once it is fully defined.

Smart Grid is another topic that can benefit from the same features that we offer to assist in NERC compliance. In simple terms, Smart Grid is designed to provide an ability for every item on the electric grid (from your appliances at home, equipment used in industry, electric distribution and generation equipment) to be linked together for the purpose of universal monitoring and control. In the case of Smart Grid, this allows for the switching of resources and loads to take the most advantage of available power sources and matching them to needs. This becomes even more important as we move toward Sustainable Energy sources (i.e. Wind, Geothermal, Solar etc.) instead of traditional power generation methods.

When it comes to Smart Grid the HindlePower AT products are advantageous because we provide, our DNP & MODBUS Communications Capability. Using the Communications Capability our AT Series battery charger becomes an active player in concert within any Smart Grid system. The ability to monitor and control the DC system from a remote locale using either DNP or MODBUS is integral to Smart Grid success.

For more information about these topics or any other questions about HindlePower please contact us directly.

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Tech Tip: AT Series - Remote Voltage Sensing


By: Art Salander
Application Engineering/Business Development
Senior Member - IEEE

I recently heard a customer remark, "Wouldn't it be terrific if my battery charger would actually read voltage at the battery terminals and correct for the voltage drop between the charger and battery?"

The great news is that all AT Series Battery Chargers already do that! All AT10.1 Group I, Group II and AT30 Series Battery Charger are equipped with a Remote Voltage Sensing feature. While most battery users must measure voltage at the battery terminals to ensure proper float and equalize voltage settings, users of the AT Series do not have to do that.

Using the Remote Sensing feature is easy. There are two (2) positive and negative stud terminals located on every AT Series I/O panel, used exclusively for Remote Sense. Just move the charger's two (2) internal sense leads from the normal dc output terminals (TB1+/-) to the Remote Sense terminals. Wire #s vary from product line. Next, connect a user-supplied twisted pair of wires to the battery terminals and... viola (excuse my French)! You are monitoring battery terminal voltage, and compensating for it as well. See figure below.


Advantages of Using AT Series Remote Sensing:
1) Remote error sensing compensates for any voltage drop between the charger and battery, to ensure proper float and equalize voltages.
2) The charger's metering will monitor the actual battery terminal voltage when remote Sensing is used.
3) There is an Error Code which constantly monitors the Remote Sensing circuit to report a malfunction.
4) All AT Series Battery Chargers offer Remote Sensing, included at no extra charge.

For a greater explanation of this feature, see Section 1.9 in any of the three (3) AT Series Operating and Service Instructions. For questions or comments regarding this feature or anything else about our products, please let us know.

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Battery Charger Maintenance

We are frequently asked what type of preventative maintenance is required for our SCR and AT Series Battery Chargers. See attached links to HindlePower Documents JD5022-00 (SCR/SCRF) and JD0064-00 (AT10.1/AT30) detailing these procedures. If you have further questions concerning charger maintenance or require technical support, please don’t hesitate to contact us at 610-330-9000.

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NEWS February 2012


HindlePower Provides AT10 Charger to Smart Grid Labs

HindlePower is proud to announce our recent AT10 Charger donation to the Enernex Smart Grid Labs in Knoxville Tennessee. It will be used in the lab for training and demonstration exercises.

The charger's installation will coincide with the grand opening of the Smart Grid Labs on February 29th. EnerNex's Smart Grid Labs (SGL) is a premier testing and evaluation facility providing multi-faceted services related to communications, security, standards compliance and a wide range of laboratory capabilities for utilities and product vendors.

The AT10 Charger we supplied is equipped with the DNP3 Communications Protocol with an Ethernet connection to allow a seamless interface into the Smart Grid architecture. Both of these options are available on the entire line of AT10 and AT30 Series Chargers.

The AT Series Charger Communication's Board is compatible with DNP3 and Modbus RTU protocols and equipped with both an RS232 and RS485 interfaces. We also offer options to connect to both Serial Fiber and Ethernet Networks. The AT Series Communications Options allow users to remotely access charger operation, configuration and battery temperature (with optional temperature probe). This data can be used by the SCADA system to provide data logs and trends for system maintenance.

For more information on EnerNex, please click on the following links:
http://www.enernex.com/sgl/
http://www.enernex.com/blog/the-smart-grid-labs-grand-opening-is-february-29/#!/

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Optional AT30 Gate Driver for Generator Powered Applications

Diesel and Gas powered generators are commonly used as a source for emergency backup power. Generators have an internal control loop that is designed to maintain a constant frequency and output voltage over a designated load range. When the load connected to a generator changes rapidly or a large step change in load occurs, rapid variations can occur in frequency and voltage while the generator compensates for the change in load.

Phase controlled battery chargers also have an internal control loop to regulate their DC output voltage. The charger's control loop continuously monitors the AC input voltage and frequency and makes adjustments to maintain a stable regulated DC output voltage.

Control Loop Stability Issues
When a charger is connected to a generator and is energized, the charger slowly ramps up its DC output voltage. The charger will not see any load, nor will the generator, until the charger's output voltage exceeds the battery voltage. At this point the charger will see a step change in load. When the charger detects the load, it adjusts its internal SCR control accordingly and draws current from the generator, which may result in a drop in the input voltage and frequency. The generator control loop then adjusts to correct for the additional load and may cause the charger to overshoot due to the rapid increase in input voltage and frequency. Once the charger backs off, the load is once again reduced requiring the generator to readjust.

Depending on the type and size of the generator, the system's standing load requirements, the state of charge of the battery, and the relative size of the load step change, this may result in a control loop oscillation in the charger and in the generator.

AT30 Gate Driver Specifically Designed for Generator Applications
In response to this possible application issue, HindlePower offers an optional Gate Driver Board that has a modified control loop that is specifically tuned to work in generator applications. This Gate Driver Board can be used in place of the standard Gate Driver Board when these control loop oscillations occur with generator applications.

The optional Gate Driver Board used in generator applications has a faster and coarser control loop to account for rapid and large generator voltage and frequency variations. The standard Gate Driver utilizes a less aggressive control loop that is better tuned to work with a stable fixed AC input source. The standard less aggressive control loop is designed to optimize DC output stability and minimize ripple when rapid input fluctuations are not present on the input source.

Std Gate Driver:12 VDC EN5008-01, 24 VDC EN5008-02, 48 VDC EN5008-03, 130 VDC EN5008-04
Std Gate Driver Kit:12 VDC EN5199-01, 24 VDC EN5199-02, 48 VDC EN5199-03, 130 VDC EN5199-04
Gen Gate Driver:12 VDC EN5008-11, 24 VDC EN5008-12, 48 VDC EN5008-13, 130VDC EN5008-14
Gen Gate Driver Kit:12 VDC EN5199-11, 24 VDC EN5199-12, 48 VDC EN5199-13, 130VDC EN5199-14

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NEWS January 2012


HindlePower at 2012 IEEE-PES Transmission and Distribution Conference and Exhibition
Orlando, FL

This year's IEEE-PES T&D Conference and Exhibition, arguably the most prominent and important event in the Utility Industry, will be held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL on May 7 through 10, 2012. This 4-day venue brings together several hundred industry professionals for conference topics and exhibits focused on power transmission and distribution. HindlePower will, once again, be exhibiting at this event (Booth # 3383). Exhibits run May 8 through 10, 2012. We look forward to seeing you there!

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HindlePower at Battcon 2012
Hollywood, FL

We are pleased to announce that HindlePower, Inc. will be exhibiting and speaking at the 16th annual Battcon® 2012 International Stationary Battery Conference and Trade Show to be held at the Westin Diplomat Resort, Hollywood, Florida on May 15 through May 17, 2012.

Battcon® is a three day, non-commercial, technical event for storage battery users from a broad range of industries. It is the premier conference for end-users, technologists, and manufacturers. The event features a two day trade show packed with storage power related vendors, plus optional seminars with CEU's awarded. Users, manufacturers of batteries and battery test equipment, installers, researchers, and standards and safety experts attend the conference to learn about and discuss the latest industry developments.

This year, Matthew Theriault, Engineering and Technical Support, will be presenting a paper entitled: "Unusual Features and Options Requested for Battery Charger."

Matt's paper discusses the migration history of several DC bus options requested in battery chargers. While these requests are made in an effort to achieve system reliability and cost savings from additional ancillary product purchases, this practice may, in fact, add liability to the DC bus.

Battcon.com

Follow the links above to the official websites for both conferences where you can make reservations. We look forward to seeing you at these events!

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REVISED CHARGER AC INPUT CURRENT DATA

Due to inconsistencies in our published information, HindlePower Engineering has re-calculated and revised the Maximum AC Input Current Data for all AT10, AT30 and SCR Series Battery Chargers. The new values are listed on our document DC5016-00.

We are currently reviewing and revising all documentation including product literature. Updated information will be posted on our website, followed by a reprint of all affected collateral materials. We will update you as we work to complete this revision project.

In the interim, follow this link to the most recent MAXIMUM AC INPUT CURRENT DATA table on HindlePowerInc.com.: (DC5016-00)

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Tech Tip: dBrn Who? Handling requests for C Message Weighting Noise Limits

My customer is asking for the charger to have 32 dBrnC acoustic noise. What is this?


Actually, it's electrical noise, not acoustic noise. This is a specification designed to limit the electrical noise that the charger produces in the voice band in telecommunications equipment. Think of the hum or static that you sometimes hear on the telephone.

What do you mean by voice band?

The charger has a dc output, right? Is the charger going to start talking? No, but this spec has to do with telecommunication equipment that may be powered by the dc bus. This could be a telephone system. The customer wants to be sure that any noise on the dc output of the charger won't interfere with voice communications.

He's ordering a filtered charger. There shouldn't be any noise...right?

Almost right. A charger's dc filter reduces the ripple, which is measured in millivolts (mV), and is usually 30 mV or less for a filtered charger. But the ripple frequency is 120 Hz for a single phase charger. The voice band is higher, running from about 300 to about 3500 Hz. The dc output voltage of the charger can, and usually does, have some noise in this frequency range. Your customer wants to be sure that the noise in those frequencies is controlled. Usually, the ripple filter does take care of it.

So what does dBrnC mean?

Figure courtesy of Lindos7 through Wikipedia
dB (decibel) is a relative measurement of noise, including acoustic noise. That's why there is sometimes some confusion, because chargers also have an acoustic noise spec, measured in dB(A). But in this case we're measuring electrical noise.

rn simply stands for reference noise. The reference in this case is a power level of 1 picowatt (pW). That's a pretty low number – one millionth of a microwatt. And the C refers to the filter used to shape the frequency response inside the voice band. The shape of the filter is shown in the figure below. When we use this filter to measure the noise, we say that we have a C message weighted signal.

I looked at that curve. You also have something in there called CCITT something, but the two curves look almost the same. CCITT is the old name for an ITU (Internal Telecommunications Union) agency that prepares telecomm standards. In other words, it's the international standard, equivalent to the C Message weighting standard used in the U.S.

All right, let's see if I understand this. There's noise on the output of the charger. We're going to pass that electrical noise through your C filter, and then measure the voltage. But how do we get that translated into dBrnC?

Well, we're using a special test set, of course. The test set has the filter built in, and it also provides a 600 Ohm standard load. When we measure the filtered voltage on that 600 Ohm resistor, we can calculate power. The test set is already scaled to a reference level of 1 pW, and so we end up with a measurement in dBrnC. Or, we can just stop when we get the power, if we've been asked to meet the psophometric weighted limits.

The sophomoric?

The psophometric weighting curve is the one specified in the ITU-T standard 0.41. That used to be called the CCITT standard. You noticed earlier that it's almost the same as the C weighting curve. Customers sometimes ask for a psophometric measurement, but usually they want a C message weighted spec. Figure courtesy of Lindos7 through Wikipedia I think I follow. But I need to know the bottom line. What am I supposed to order? A charger with a standard dc filter will meet the 32 dBrnC requirement. To meet the 26 dBrnC spec, order a battery eliminator filter option on the charger.

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NEWS December 2011

Revised list of AT SERIES 3rd PARTY AGENCY APPROVALS now available! !

We have just revised our AT SERIES 3rd PARTY AGENCY APPROVALS. Click the link to see the
new matrices.

AT SERIES 3rd PARTY AGENCY APPROVALS

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Introducing Roy Gates as the newest member of the HindlePower Family

It is our sincere privilege to announce Roy Gates has joined our organization as the newest member of the HindlePower Sales and Marketing Team.

Roy is a seasoned professional, bringing with him over 25-years' experience in the industrial standby battery business. During that time, Roy fulfilled many roles including battery installation and service, product training and sales management. As a sought after speaker within the IEEE Continuing Education Community, Roy has presented several papers on selection, sizing and configuration of all types of energy storage devices. Specific to stationary chargers, Roy's input was instrumental in the design and manufacture of both our Single-Cell and Universal Maintenance Chargers.

Roy also brings with him a unique customer perspective, having worked with both HindlePower and Hitran as a long-time channel partner. His customer-focused insights will prove vital in allowing us to provide a higher level support to your needs. Roy's expertise, commitment and enthusiasm will be focused on ensuring your success. His role includes RFQ review/price quotations, joint sales appointments, customer presentations and trade show support, to name a few.

Please join us in welcoming Roy Gates to the HindlePower Family.

Roy's contact information:
Email: rgates@hindlepowerinc.com
Office: 610-330-9000 Ext. 231

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TECH TIP!
AT SERIES CHARGERS Voltmeter Calibration with Temperature Compensation Option

The AT10.1 voltmeter is adjusted at the factory to display the actual output voltage within ±0.25%. If you replace any component that affects meter accuracy, such as the main control circuit board or R4, you should readjust the meter.

1) Turn off (open) the charger's dc breaker and then the ac breaker.

2) Disconnect the temperature probe from the Main Control Board by removing the two wires from TB8 at the bottom of the Main Control Board.

3) Close the dc breaker and then close the ac breaker.

4) Adjust the float voltage to the desired value.

5) Press and hold the UP key, then press the EQLZ MTHD key - The DC VOLTS METER MODE indicator will light, and the meter display flashes the output voltage reading.

6) Measure the output voltage of the AT charger using a dc meter accurate to ±0.25% or better. (Measure at REMOTE SENSE terminals if using REMOTE SENSE option).

7) While watching the meter connected to the charger's output (not the front panel meter), press the UP or DOWN key until the actual output voltage matches the float setting on the front panel meter.

- Each time you press UP or DOWN, you change the charger's output voltage by a small amount. Continue to press UP or DOWN until the actual output voltage agrees with the front panel reading within ±0.25%.

- Allow one or two seconds for the output voltage to stabilize each time you press the UP or DOWN key.

8) When you are finished adjusting the output voltage, the charger waits 5 seconds, then the display returns to normal operation.

9) Turn off (open) the charger's dc breaker and then the ac breaker.

10) Reconnect the temperature probe to TB8 of the Main Control Board.

11) Close the dc breaker and then close the ac breaker.

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NEWS November 2011

Did you receive the most recent HindlePower News?

We just released our November issue of our monthly email newsletter. If you didn't receive the email in your inbox you can click the link below to see the November issue. You can join our mailing list by entering your email address in the box at the top of this page.

Click Here for the November Issue

NERC Events
Prepared by Art Salander - Business Development, Applications Engineering

As of this writing the NERC Standard PRC-005-2 has been modified at least 8 times since its first inception on June 5, 2007. The most recent version came out in draft form on August 11th, 2011.

Our focus with regard to PRC-005-2 has been on those items that would reflect the DC portion of this draft. It seems, from the current version, the authors have now further defined the differences between those items that need to be maintained and those that may just be reported. The basics of this standard has not changed; that is, provide a standard practice to help ensure electric reliability by developing a standard for verification, monitoring, testing, inspection and calibration.

With regard to the battery portions of this system, including the chargers, we only need to look at Table 1-4 to see what the committee is trying to accomplish. At this point, the committee has set a series of tasks in which either specified periodic inspections or monitoring may be used. Table 1-4f provides for items that could exclude inspections by performing electronic dc monitoring. If you monitor certain key attributes of a battery system you may eliminate the periodic checks mentioned in Table 1-4a through e. At this point, as you provide for specific monitoring you eliminate the need for periodic maintenance.

The way the current standard is going, if you have enough remote monitoring you never would have to actually look at the battery system at all! While this sounds good at the surface, an amalgam of inspections and monitoring is your best bet to provide reliability. A requirement for careful maintenance planning is the best solution as no one device will provide the complete and universal NERC solution for battery monitoring. If such a single NERC solution device exists, maintaining that device might be more complicated then maintaining the battery itself!

We are interested in your opinions. Please E-Mail me directly at asalander@hindlepowerinc.com with your opinion about NERC requirements and solutions. We will publish the best one's in our upcoming E-Newsletters

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NRTL 3rd Party Certifications
Prepared by Art Salander - Business Development, Applications Engineering

Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) is the agency of the US Government tasked with certifying independent testing laboratories in the USA for the purpose of providing 3rd party certifications. OSHA currently lists 17 laboratories as NRTL (NRTL – National Recognized Testing Laboratory). You may see the current list of NRTLs at http://www.osha.gov/dts/otpca/nrtl.

NRTL Program recognizes and certifies private sector organizations as NRTLs. Recognition signifies that an organization has met the necessary qualifications specified in the regulations for the program. The NRTL determines that specific equipment and materials ("products") meet consensus-based standards of safety to provide the assurance, required by OSHA, and that these products are safe for use.

The quagmire associated with 3rd party certifications can be very confusing. Many people are in doubt about what it really means to test a product and provide a 3rd party certification. Most Americans will request a UL listing without realizing that Underwriters Laboratories (UL) is an independent, private, not for profit corporation formed in 1894 to provide fire safety standards for products manufactured in the United States. UL is not a government agency and has no official powers to regulate product merchantability, nor is it a preferred resource by OSHA.

For many years HindlePower used Canadian Standards Association (CSA) its NRTL testing. CSA is also a participant in OSHA's "Cooperative Arrangement between the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Standards Council of Canada (SCC)". This allows us to use a single point firm to provide both our Canadian and US domestic NRTL certification thereby eliminating duplication.

NEWS October 2011

Are you in need of HindlePower Literature, Drawings or Manuals?

As a reminder, we maintain an inventory of product literature available to you for sales appointments, presentations, trade shows, etc. If you would like to receive any of our hard-copy brochures, please complete the request form (offered in both Word andAdobe Acrobat formats) and return to us via email or fax. Instructions are printed on the form. Also, our web-site contains additional collateral materials such as operations manuals, drawings
and instructions.

Here's a link to our on-line technical library: http://www.hindlepowerinc.com/StandardDocs.htm.
If you prefer unlabeled AT Series manuals and drawings, please click this link: http://atseries.net/

Best regards,

Gary Guagliardi
Director Sales & Marketing
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NEWS August 2011

Manufacturing is hardly dead!

You've heard it before -- manufacturing is dead. Not so, says our own Bill Hindle. Industries are hiring; they just can't find enough qualified workers. Last Thursday (8/11), Bill and several local company CEOs gathered at Cedar Crest College in Allentown, PA, as part of the Lehigh Valley Manufacturing Summit. The summit joined business leaders with school superintendents and others to meet and figure out ways to teach kids the skills they'll need for the next generation of manufacturing jobs. Click the video above and follow the link to the channel 69 (WFMZ) news story.

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HINDLEPOWER becomes a movie star ... with it's supporting role in the Davinci Science Center's "I'm a maker" video series.

A film crew from DaVinci Science Center recently shot a short video at HindlePower as part of their "Summer of Manufacturing" Series. The video offers an overview of the products we build, why we build, and most importantly, the people who build them. The science center's "I'm a Maker" Program highlights local companies by emphasizing the educational importance and economic benefits manufacturing offers on their local communities.

In addition to the video, HindlePower constructed and donated an interactive display located in the Science Centers' Wing entitled "How People Make Things." Inspired by the Mister Roger's Factory Tours, the displays engages visitors actively through the entire manufacturing process for making a variety of products made here in the Lehigh Valley of Pennsylvania.

We hope you have as much fun watching the video as we did participating in it. The DaVinci Science Center's "Summer of Manufacturing" is taking place now through October 16, 2011. If you're in the Allentown area, stop by and check it out. Here's a link to the science center's web-site: davincisciencecenter.org

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NEWS June 2011

HINDLEPOWER participates in DaVinci Science Center's "How People Make Things, Summer of Manufacturing"


The Summer of Manufacturing is anchored by the Da Vinci Science Center's presentation of the How People Make Things exhibit, inspired by the Mister Rogers' Factory Tours. This blockbuster exhibit engages visitors actively through the entire manufacturing process for making crayons, golf carts, ice cream cups, baseball gloves, and other familiar products.

In addition to the How People Make Things Exhibit, DaVinci Science Center is presenting a region-wide Summer of Manufacturing initiative throughout eastern Pennsylvania and western New Jersey. Summer of Manufacturing highlights the powerful, vibrant manufacturing driving economy and culture throughout eastern Pennsylvania and western New Jersey, the region's manufacturing heritage, and the cutting-edge manufacturing that will provide the future's products and services.

When HindlePower was approached to be part of this initiative we jumped at the chance to participate. Our exhibit focuses on converting AC to DC power and allows the visitors the chance to create a "diode bridge". We are excited to be participating in an initiative that focuses on conveying, to children, the importance and validity of manufacturing in Pennsylvania.

If you visit the DaVinci Science Center between June 4 – October 16 make sure to try "Diode Mania" at HindlePower "Harnessing Electricity" booth.

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NEWS April 2011

Pennsylvania Congressman Visits HindlePower


Charlie Dent, United States Congressman representing Pennsylvania's 15th District, visited HindlePower on April 18, 2011. His HindlePower stopover was in keeping with his commitment to get better acquainted with businesses located in his congressional district.

Congressman Dent's visit lasted about 90 minutes. He toured our facility, asked questions and appeared very interested in our company culture. At the conclusion of his plant tour, Congressman Dent spoke to us about the state of the economy on both the local and world stage.

About Charlie Dent:
Charlie Dent was first sworn in to the United States House of Representatives in January 2005. He represents Pennsylvania's 15th District, which includes all or parts of Lehigh, Northampton, Montgomery, and Berks counties. Congressman Dent currently serves on two House committees: Appropriations and Ethics.

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HindlePower to attend Battcon® 2011 International Stationary Battery Conference and Trade Show

We are pleased to announce that HindlePower, Inc. will again be exhibiting at the 15th annual Battcon® 2011 International Stationary Battery Conference and Trade Show, to be held May 16 through 18, 2011 at the Swan and Dolphin Resort in Orlando, Florida.

Battcon 2011® is a three day, non-commercial, technical event for stationary battery users from a broad range of markets including Utility, Telecom, UPS and Industrial. It is the premier conference for end-users, technologists, and manufacturers.

This conference includes a two-day trade show packed with DC Power related vendors. HindlePower's booth number is 114-116.

A broad cross section of attendees including Battery, Battery Test Equipment and DC Power Manufacturers, End Users, Engineering Firms, EF&I Integrators, and Standards & Safety experts. The goal of the conference is to discuss and learn more about product and industry related issues including new industry developments.

Art Salander, Business Development and Application Engineer, has been accepted by the Battcon® Technical Committee to deliver a paper at this upcoming conference. His topic involves the use of steering diodes in engineering more reliable dc systems for critical applications. Art's paper is entitled Designing More Reliable Battery Systems Using Steering Diodes, aka Best Battery Selectors.

We will also be showcasing our AT10.1 Series Microprocessor-controlled battery chargers, Best Battery Selectors and DC Systems including our outdoor Consoles and Trailers.

If you plan on attending, please stop by our booth to say hello. We look forward to seeing you in Orlando at the world's premier stationary battery conference.

Battcon 2011 Offical Site

Best regards,

Gary Guagliardi
Director Sales & Marketing

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NEWS March 2011


Employee Celebrates 40 years at
HindlePower.

Everyone at HindlePower would like to extend a "Thank You and Congratulations" to Manuel "Manny" Ramirez for his 40 years of continued service and commitment to HindlePower. If you see Manny around our production facility please stop by and thank him for helping to ensure the quality & integrity of HindlePower products for 40 years.

Thank you Manny. We are proud to have you as member of our team and we look forward to working with you for many years to come.

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NEWS February 2011

HindlePower Introduces New Marketing Assistant

To All Our Valued Sales Channel Partners,

We are very pleased to announce another new addition to our HindlePower Family. 
Kyle Huggins joined our organization recently as our new Marketing & Communications Assistant.  Please join me in welcoming Kyle to HindlePower.

Best regards,

Gary Guagliardi
Director Sales & Marketing

 

I would like to take a moment to introduce myself as the newest addition to the HindlePower team.  As a Marketing & Communications Assistant, I will be responsible for creating and implementing innovative approaches for better communication with you and the markets we serve.  Activities include updating visual tools to enhance and amplify the benefits of our products and services to better assist in your sales endeavors.

Working closely with Gary Guagliardi, Director of Sales and Marketing, we will be collaborating on several projects including web-site enhancements for easier site navigation, a product photo library, flash technology for instructional video and links to social media.  Another project involves revised literature with a fresh layout and new photos, along with a newly designed trade show booth.

I graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2008, with a B.A. Degree in Studio Art and a concentration in graphic design.  I have three years experience as an in-house designer working with multiple freelance clients.  I'm excited to begin tackling this new, challenging position.  A key goal is to create a heightened brand aesthetic bridging the quality of our products with our valued sales channels who promote and sell them.

I am confident that my skills in design and photography will greatly assist in connecting you with your customers and prospects.  I am very excited and look forward to meeting and working with you.

Sincerely,

Kyle Huggins
Marketing & Communications Assistant
HindlePower, Inc.
1075 Saint John Street
Easton, PA  18042
Office: 610.330.9000 (ext. 227)
Fax: 610.330.8510

 

NEWS April 2010

HindlePower at Battcon 2010

We are pleased to announce that HindlePower, Inc. will again be exhibiting at the 14th annual Battcon® 2010 International Stationary Battery Conference and Trade Show, to be held May 17 through 19, 2010 at the Westin Diplomat Hotel in Hollywood, Florida.Battcon® 2010 is a three day, non-commercial, technical event for stationary battery users from a broad range of markets including Utility, Telecom, UPS and Industrial.  It is the premier conference for end-users, technologists, and manufacturers.

This conference includes a two-day trade show packed with DC Power related vendors. HindlePower's booth number is 415-417.

A broad cross section of attendees include Battery, Battery Test Equipment and DC Power Manufacturers, End Users, Engineering Firms, EF&I Value-added Integrators, and Standards & Safety experts.  The goal of the conference is to learn and discuss more about product and industry related issues and new developments.

Matt Theriault, our Product Specialist, has once again been accepted by the Battcon® Technical Committee to deliver a paper at this upcoming conference.  His topic involves designing dc systems in substations, considering repair and maintenance.  It is entitled Battery Circuits for Stationary Applications Designed for the Long Haul.

We will also be showcasing our AT10.1 Series single phase microprocessor-controlled battery charger, AT30 Series three phase microprocessor-controlled battery charger, AT-DC Series distribution panel, Universal Maintenance Charger (UMC), and Single Cell Charger.

If you are planning on attending Battcon® 2010, please stop by our booth to say hello.  We look forward to seeing you in Hollywood at The World's Leading Stationary Battery Conference.

Best regards,

Gary Guagliardi
Director Sales & Marketing

 

 

Further HindlePower updates available in Archived NEWS!

HindlePower Inc

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AT10.1 | AT30 | AT Comm | AT-DC | SCR/SCRF | EPIC | UMC | RMC | Single Cell | TBC | DC Disc | CEMF | DC Trailer

All designs and specifications subject to change.